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Veterans Day


pipedreams
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Today, November 11th, is Veteran's Day.  Not tomorrow when some get a day off

from work in "observance," but today, the 11th, every November 11th.

 

From History. com:

  • 16.1 million living veterans served during at least one war.
  • 5.2 million veterans served in peacetime.
  • 2 million veterans are women.
  • 7 million veterans served during the Vietnam War era (1964-1975).
  • 5.5 million veterans served during the Gulf War (representing service from Aug. 2, 1990, to present).
  • Of the 16 million Americans who served during World War II (1941-1945), about 558,000 are still alive.
  • 2 million veterans served during the Korean War (1950-1953).
  • 6 million veterans served in peacetime.
  • As of 2014, 2.9 million veterans received compensation for service-connected disabilities.
  • As of 2014, 3 states have more than 1 million veterans in among their population: California (1.8 million), Florida (1.6 million), Texas (1.7 million).
  • The VA healthcare system had 54 hospitals in 1930.  Since then it has expanded to include 171 medical centers, more than 350 outpatient, community and outreach clinics, 126 nursing home care units, and 35 live-in care facilities for injured or disabled vets.
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I appreciate the sentiments that people express these days toward those of us whom served in the military. It is altogether a different time than when I returned to CONUS from RVN in 1969.

When traveling in uniform, you got a mixed bag of reactions from folks. The older people, veterans, cops and people that had family in the service were friendly. Most of the girls my age were pretty crude. It was obvious that they preferred the long hair, smart ass, hippie type guys. I never associated with that type and I sure wasn’t going to become one of them when I got out.

The young people seemed preoccupied with things that were insignificant to me. Clothing, rock bands, girls who were compulsive about their hair and makeup. Even after discharge, my attitudes never changed about these types of things..... to this day.

I was a very fortunate man, however. When I was a patient at Portsmouth Naval Hospital (Non-combat injury), I met a young Navy Corpswave. She was an Okie of Native American decent, and I was a New York City born Yankee: neither of us was looking for someone, but we hit it off.

She was pure country and lived out of town when she grew up. Her Grandparents had a Cattle Ranch and her parents lived nearby. She raised foxes, had a big pet male raccoon that would open the door and sneak in the house to get in her room, had dogs, cats, and a pony when she was a kid. She still reminds me of a brunette Elly Mae Clampet.

She joined the Navy the week after she graduated High School. A smart, serious girl with a true heart. We got married eight months after we met and secured a transfer to St. Albans Naval Hospital in Queens, NYC, New York where she finished her enlistment. I was out, working and going to night school. She married me before I had a job! We had two boys after she was discharged and we lived in NYC for seven years.

We moved to Oklahoma in 1977 at my preference. She became an RN after we moved using her G.I. Bill. I wouldn’t move back to a Metropolitan area for anything..... well, unless she made me do it. We will be married 48 years on December 19th. I am very, very proud of this girl for her intelligence, integrity and her service to the country.






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10 minutes ago, C_Hallbert said:

I appreciate the sentiments that people express these days toward those of us whom served in the military. It is altogether a different time than when I returned to CONUS from RVN in 1969.

When traveling in uniform, you got a mixed bag of reactions from folks. The older people, veterans, cops and people that had family in the service were friendly. Most of the girls my age were pretty crude. It was obvious that they preferred the long hair, smart ass, hippie type guys. I never associated with that type and I sure wasn’t going to become one of them when I got out.

The young people seemed preoccupied with things that were insignificant to me. Clothing, rock bands, girls who were compulsive about their hair and makeup. Even after discharge, my attitudes never changed about these types of things..... to this day.

I was a very fortunate man, however. When I was a patient at Portsmouth Naval Hospital (Non-combat injury), I met a young Navy Corpswave. She was an Okie of Native American decent, and I was a New York City born Yankee: neither of us was looking for someone, but we hit it off.

She was pure country and lived out of town when she grew up. Her Grandparents had a Cattle Ranch and her parents lived nearby. She raised foxes, had a big pet male raccoon that would open the door and sneak in the house to get in her room, had dogs, cats, and a pony when she was a kid. She still reminds me of a brunette Elly Mae Clampet.

She joined the Navy the week after she graduated High School. A smart, serious girl with a true heart. We got married eight months after we met and secured a transfer to St. Albans Naval Hospital in Queens, NYC, New York where she finished her enlistment. I was out, working and going to night school. She married me before I had a job! We had two boys after she was discharged and we lived in NYC for seven years.

We moved to Oklahoma in 1977 at my preference. She became an RN after we moved using her G.I. Bill. I wouldn’t move back to a Metropolitan area for anything..... well, unless she made me do it. We will be married 48 years on December 19th. I am very, very proud of this girl for her intelligence, integrity and her service to the country.






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Good post Halibert. ?

I was a Navy Brat at that time, family was living off base attached to Concord Naval Weapons Station where the bombs bound for Vietnam were loaded on the AE ships @ Port Chicago. About half the Tug Office crew had served or would serve in the Brown Water Navy. I recall waiting in the base gym for jud/jui jitsu class to start and watching a Marine Corporal train the young Jarheads in crowd control techniques. He seemed pretty good, not a guy you want to piss off. My uncle had served with the AHC162nd as a door gunner and just got back the year before. I am glad for that upbringing because it ruled out joining the scum who hate the US military. 

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"We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields."

from In Flanders Fields, John McCrae

 

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6 hours ago, pipedreams said:

"We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields."

from In Flanders Fields, John McCrae

 

68747470733a2f2f6d65646961302e67697068792e636f6d2f6d656469612f327a6f4373574d476f337132385a5641485a2f-26237326666356265393237336634383439373134363633366634386538.gif.216bb798388ac069cb61042e94087187.gif

That's a very evocative poem. Here is an interesting article about the adoption of the poppy by so many nations. http://www.history.com/news/world-war-i-poppy-remembrance-symbol-veterans-day

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14 minutes ago, G26S239 said:

That's a very evocative poem. Here is an interesting article about the adoption of the poppy by so many nations. http://www.history.com/news/world-war-i-poppy-remembrance-symbol-veterans-day

The National WWI Museum and Memorial in K.C. MO. is also a great source.

Has a  wonderful poppy display.  https://www.theworldwar.org/explore/museum-and-memorial

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