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Finally decided on what to spend some of my doggy bite money on.


astepup
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A little over a year ago I was attacked by a dog while delivering mail. The little bastard tore my hand open pretty good. Anyways I got my insurance settlement check around a month ago or so and decided I needed just ONE more gun. The only platform I have nothing close to is the AK and was considering getting a nice example. Then I started taking a hard look at what I'd really use it for, and realized I have many other fine guns that I can plink with and make some noise. Then I remembered 15 years ago while on a date I spotted a Win M-12 20 with factory vent rib, mod choke and original box with all the paperwork. Everything. And it looked unfired with a price of $1900. This was shortly after my divorce and I really didn't have the funds at the time.

Fast forward to today. Few weeks ago I found one on a "popular firearm bidding website" that was a field grade but it has the deluxe wood option. I have a hardcover book about the history of the M-12 (between dad and I we have five already) so I know that option wasn't chosen very much. Dad said he remembered back in the late 50's that a M-12 was about $15-$20 more than a Rem 870 and he didn't have the extra so he got the Rem. The deluxe wood was an additional cost so not a lot were put on the field grade guns. Well today i placed a bid on what looks to be a fine example and won the thing. I'll post pics when I get it (hopefully within a week or so) and am itching to see how she patterns. It's pheasant season now and I'd love to bag my limit with an old M-12.

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Sounds like it is a purchase that you will not regret and will be something you can truly appreciate.  Awesome!

I grew up big game hunting so bird hunting was something that was more of a distraction than a focus this time of year.  I never developed a fondness nor an appreciation for a quality shotgun.

My arsenal included only a Weatherby tactical pump 12ga built for turkeys, a sawed off single shot built for rattlesnakes, and a Beretta Silver Snipe 20ga over/under my dad gave me as a teen that has killed nothing other than a few jackrabbits in Southern Idaho.

I haven't pheasant hunted for decades, have never waterfowled, and never pursued quail like a true gentleman.

A couple of Christmases ago, my dad presented me with my grandfather's shotgun.  Grandpa had grown up dirt poor in Wisconsin and lived off the land.  He was a trapper for many years as a boy, riding the rails with hobos to check his trap lines.  His approach to firearms was to buy only what you barely needed, and to buy what worked.

He owned three firearms in his adult life; a 30.-06 Remington semi-auto, a Remington semi-auto .22 rifle, and a Remington semi-auto shotgun. Obviously he had his preferences...

I now have in my posession, his Remington .22 and his Remington shotgun.  I have not taken either afield, but I have fired both.  The shotgun is a licensed copy of the Browning A5, and it comes up quickly and balances well, and kicks like a mule.  It has spent decades in a duck blind, or the wheat fields of Idaho, and I can still smell the wood stove heated shop where grandpa would process the ducks.  I haven't had duck since I was a boy at grandpa's house.

Since your thread was one of fond nostalgia, I thought it appropriate to share my only nostalgic memory of a true working man's shotgun.

The wood is anything but fancy, and the bluing well worn, but it is a firearm that I treasure as much as I'm sure you will treasure your new shotgun...

100_1170.thumb.JPG.5d3d07e1c1e85bc85b7f2eb25f52faa0.JPG

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On 10/31/2018 at 2:34 AM, PNWguy said:

Sounds like it is a purchase that you will not regret and will be something you can truly appreciate.  Awesome!

I grew up big game hunting so bird hunting was something that was more of a distraction than a focus this time of year.  I never developed a fondness nor an appreciation for a quality shotgun.

My arsenal included only a Weatherby tactical pump 12ga built for turkeys, a sawed off single shot built for rattlesnakes, and a Beretta Silver Snipe 20ga over/under my dad gave me as a teen that has killed nothing other than a few jackrabbits in Southern Idaho.

I haven't pheasant hunted for decades, have never waterfowled, and never pursued quail like a true gentleman.

A couple of Christmases ago, my dad presented me with my grandfather's shotgun.  Grandpa had grown up dirt poor in Wisconsin and lived off the land.  He was a trapper for many years as a boy, riding the rails with hobos to check his trap lines.  His approach to firearms was to buy only what you barely needed, and to buy what worked.

He owned three firearms in his adult life; a 30.-06 Remington semi-auto, a Remington semi-auto .22 rifle, and a Remington semi-auto shotgun. Obviously he had his preferences...

I now have in my posession, his Remington .22 and his Remington shotgun.  I have not taken either afield, but I have fired both.  The shotgun is a licensed copy of the Browning A5, and it comes up quickly and balances well, and kicks like a mule.  It has spent decades in a duck blind, or the wheat fields of Idaho, and I can still smell the wood stove heated shop where grandpa would process the ducks.  I haven't had duck since I was a boy at grandpa's house.

Since your thread was one of fond nostalgia, I thought it appropriate to share my only nostalgic memory of a true working man's shotgun.

The wood is anything but fancy, and the bluing well worn, but it is a firearm that I treasure as much as I'm sure you will treasure your new shotgun...

100_1170.thumb.JPG.5d3d07e1c1e85bc85b7f2eb25f52faa0.JPG

To me, a gun that shows its history and heritage can look just as nice as a museum piece and the memories they can trigger are priceless. 

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