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A twelve-year-old could walk into the local Western Auto with his .22 rifle over his shoulder and buy 10 or 15 loose cartridges for the next day's hunting or just target practice.

Mine was a Winchester Model 47 that my dad bought used for, I think, $25.00.

Loved that rifle.

Many a groundhog, chipmunk and town dump rat saw the end of their days by that rifle.

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A buddy had a Remington Nylon 66.

His was black.

His father was rich.

Had to be since a lad can go through a heck of a lot more .22 Long Rifle with a semi-automatic than a one-shot bolt action.

Groundhogs, chipmunks, dump rats didn't care.

 

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I used that Winchester a lot when I was training and educating Boy Scouts.

Lads couldn't get in trouble with accidental follow-up shots with a one-shot bolt action rifle.

Pistol training was done with an SAA with one cartridge for the same reason.

The Winchester fit small lads beautifully.

I always thought that my Blackhawk was just a big big in the grip and weighed too much for small lads, but I didn't have a Single Six then.

No lad I ever trained, either in basic gun safely or for competition, ever had a negligent discharge.

I cannot imagine trying the teach the smart-ass kids of today.

I wouldn't even try and would choose to be as far away from the range as possible.

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I remember when I could judge how much the grocery bill would be by counting each item as $1.  Now it's $6 per item, and I'm buying on sale, with coupons.  I could get t-shirts for $5, and they were made of nice, thick 100% cotton.  And I could buy mass market paperbacks for $3.99.  I have some around here that were my FIL's that were even less than that.  Hardcovers were $12, and we thought that was expensive.

 

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Weekly allowance was a quarter.

But candy bars, and they were much larger than they are today, were 5 cents.

A balsa wood glider: 5 cents.

The fancy one with the rubber band propeller:  25 cents.

Comic book: 10 cents.

Mom bought your jeans three  sizes too big:; you belted the waist and rolled up the cuffs until you grew into them.

Every lad had a pocket knife in his pocket -- in third grade.

in the summer, you'd get on your bike after breakfast and go, didn't come back until the street lights came on.

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4 hours ago, Walt Longmire said:

An 18 year old kid could buy a 450 horsepower hot rod off the lot and no one batted an eye.

When I bought my first 67 Mustang new, I was in the dealer for an oil change and the salesman that sold me my car talked with me. 

He took me into the garage and showed me a, IIRC, a 67 or 68 Ford Falcon with a custom order 427, new.  As guy ordered it and the dealer co-signed for the order.  It was a straight stick and the cheapest body.

They replaced the transmission three times under warranty and the third time wouldn't give the car back until the owner got them off the title.

Times were different then.

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2 hours ago, tous said:

Weekly allowance was a quarter.

But candy bars, and they were much larger than they are today, were 5 cents.

A balsa wood glider: 5 cents.

The fancy one with the rubber band propeller:  25 cents.

Comic book: 10 cents.

Mom bought your jeans three  sizes too big:; you belted the waist and rolled up the cuffs until you grew into them.

Every lad had a pocket knife in his pocket -- in third grade.

in the summer, you'd get on your bike after breakfast and go, didn't come back until the street lights came on.

We told time by the Catholic church bells that tolled the hour.

I fell through the ice in the spring thaw of the Mississippi river, through town, twice.  We used to play along the river bank on the way home from school.  My folks never new.  Once I laid down on the ice and shimmied  out into the river and pulled a dog out that couldn't get up on the ice to get out.  Never told the folks about that either.

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2 minutes ago, janice6 said:

We told time by the Catholic church bells that tolled the hour.

I fell through the ice in the spring thaw of the Mississippi river, through town, twice.  We used to play along the river bank on the way home from school.  My folks never new.  Once I laid down on the ice and shimmied  out into the river and pulled a dog out that couldn't get up on the ice to get out.  Never told the folks about that either.

We used to play on the log pond at the cedar mill. Yeah, that was off limits but we did it anyway.

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4 hours ago, tous said:

A twelve-year-old could walk into the local Western Auto with his .22 rifle over his shoulder and buy 10 or 15 loose cartridges for the next day's hunting or just target practice.

Mine was a Winchester Model 47 that my dad bought used for, I think, $25.00.

Loved that rifle.

Many a groundhog, chipmunk and town dump rat saw the end of their days by that rifle.

I misread your post and thought you had a Model 74 as I did.  Half a box of Shorts in one load.

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3 hours ago, tous said:

I used that Winchester a lot when I was training and educating Boy Scouts.

Lads couldn't get in trouble with accidental follow-up shots with a one-shot bolt action rifle.

Pistol training was done with an SAA with one cartridge for the same reason.

The Winchester fit small lads beautifully.

I always thought that my Blackhawk was just a big big in the grip and weighed too much for small lads, but I didn't have a Single Six then.

No lad I ever trained, either in basic gun safely or for competition, ever had a negligent discharge.

I cannot imagine trying the teach the smart-ass kids of today.

I wouldn't even try and would choose to be as far away from the range as possible.

I took my permit course a long time ago and when we did the range requirement we had three rows of shooters standing in the indoor lane one in front of the other.  All with loaded pistols.  While the trainer was talking and walking back and forth in front of us all.

I told him they couldn't pay me enough to stand in front of a bunch of new shooters with loaded guns!

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11 minutes ago, Batesmotel said:

I work as a range officer at a large shooting facility. The adults are worse. 

My one inviolate rule was: fathers had to wait outside of the range or their kid couldn't shoot.

Many argued with me, but to me, it was critically important that the lads paid attention to me and not their scowling or yelling dads.

 

I have been a range officer, but only at competitions, never general free-for-all shooting.

When we used to do the range portion to qualify as CHL instructors at the DPS headquarters range, all of the troopers wore their vests. 

Based on some of the dumb I saw there, they were wide to do so.

 

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5 minutes ago, Batesmotel said:

I was pumping gas at a full service gas station in elementary school. OSHA and child labor laws my ass.

 

3 minutes ago, janice6 said:

Remember the kids with the large knuckles that spent their spare time pinsetting at the local bowling alleys.

I had a lawn mowing business at fourteen.

Weekends and summers.

Rented the lawnmower from my father.

 

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1 hour ago, tous said:

My one inviolate rule was: fathers had to wait outside of the range or their kid couldn't shoot.

Many argued with me, but to me, it was critically important that the lads paid attention to me and not their scowling or yelling dads.

 

I have been a range officer, but only at competitions, never general free-for-all shooting.

When we used to do the range portion to qualify as CHL instructors at the DPS headquarters range, all of the troopers wore their vests.  :biggrin:

 

My wife started carrying with a S&W 642  (I bought all my daughters 642's to start. 

She went to take her shooting test for her permit and they told her she was going to have to shoot at up to 60 feet, and half of her points were from the 60 foot distance.  She failed with a 2" snubby. 

I told the trainer that it was insane to teach people to shoot at that distance when they should be running away.  Back then the rules were arbitrary before they more or less standardized them.  He said it was his choice and she failed.

I asked him if there were limitations on what guns she could shoot for her test?  He said she could shoot anything.

I gave her a S&W 5.5 inch, .22 Target pistol, with Red Dot sights.  She aced the shooting test.

I still think making people think that shooting at great distances with a pistol is ok, is bullshit!

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One of the huge problems we had to overcome as instructors, , with children and adults, was Trained By Hollywood.

Most folk believe that what they see in the movies and on television is not only possible, but common.

Anybody that did the flick-of-the-wrist closure of a revolver cylinder got a ten-minute time out.

Then I told them, Keep doing that.  I charge $300.00 to repair a bent crane.

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