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Headlights…


railfancwb
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I was once pulled over by a local police officer who gave me a warning for my right headlight being out. I had a key to the shop where I worked so I went straight there and replaced it.

The very next evening, on the same road, the same police officer pulled me over again and got on my case about not fixing my headlight. I told hem that I had replaced it and got out to look. The left had burned out and he refused to believe I had fixed it. I had kept the warning and it said nowhere on it what side was out the night before and he wrote me a real ticket.

Years later I had a right headlight burn out on my Goldwing. I replaced it and by the time I got home the left was also burned out. I now always replace them in pairs.

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2 hours ago, railfancwb said:

As far as I know cars and pickups use identical bulbs for right and left headlights. Yet when I see a vehicle with only one headlight on, the right one is most frequently not burning. Wonder why the left/right mix isn’t about 50/50?

Lies, damn lies, and statistics... :(

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Most things on cars fail first on the passenger side. For brakes and tires & such, they pick up the most debris from the outside edge of the road. For suspension components, more potholes, bumps and foreign objects get run over on the outside edge of the road. For headlights, I imagine they get dowsed with a lot more water picked up from standing water on the outside edge of the road. Even for something designed for such abuse, taking a very hot item and splashing cold water on it is going to take a toll. They probably take a lot more strikes from objects thrown from other people's passenger-side tires as well. That's just a guess, of course.

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54 minutes ago, Eric said:

Most things on cars fail first on the passenger side. For brakes and tires & such, they pick up the most debris from the outside edge of the road. For suspension components, more potholes, bumps and foreign objects get run over on the outside edge of the road. For headlights, I imagine they get dowsed with a lot more water picked up from standing water on the outside edge of the road. Even for something designed for such abuse, taking a very hot item and splashing cold water on it is going to take a toll. They probably take a lot more strikes from objects thrown from other people's passenger-side tires as well. That's just a guess, of course.

Sounds like a great dissertation topic. Compare component longevity on US vs UK cars. See if the pattern holds. There's a wrinkle, of course, in the cultural differences between the two. If an entire country can't drive on the correct side of the road, who knows what other cultural influences could mess up the study? I mean, they drink warm beer and eat pies made from kidneys... :eat:

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3 minutes ago, gwalchmai said:

Sounds like a great dissertation topic. Compare component longevity on US vs UK cars. See if the pattern holds. There's a wrinkle, of course, in the cultural differences between the two. If an entire country can't drive on the correct side of the road, who knows what other cultural influences could mess up the study? I mean, they drink warm beer and eat pies made from kidneys... :eat:

And who the **** boils beef, for God's sake?

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7 hours ago, railfancwb said:

As far as I know cars and pickups use identical bulbs for right and left headlights. Yet when I see a vehicle with only one headlight on, the right one is most frequently not burning. Wonder why the left/right mix isn’t about 50/50?

Is this a veiled political observation?

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2 hours ago, gwalchmai said:

Sounds like a great dissertation topic. Compare component longevity on US vs UK cars. See if the pattern holds. There's a wrinkle, of course, in the cultural differences between the two. If an entire country can't drive on the correct side of the road, who knows what other cultural influences could mess up the study? I mean, they drink warm beer and eat pies made from kidneys... :eat:

You want to compare Lucas electrics to AC-Delco?

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3 hours ago, Eric said:

Most things on cars fail first on the passenger side. For brakes and tires & such, they pick up the most debris from the outside edge of the road. For suspension components, more potholes, bumps and foreign objects get run over on the outside edge of the road. For headlights, I imagine they get dowsed with a lot more water picked up from standing water on the outside edge of the road. Even for something designed for such abuse, taking a very hot item and splashing cold water on it is going to take a toll. They probably take a lot more strikes from objects thrown from other people's passenger-side tires as well. That's just a guess, of course.

An interesting and probably valid observation.  As you stated, outside edge of the road may mean more vibrational abuse.  Filaments don't like that.

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41 minutes ago, railfancwb said:

Most people have faith even if they don’t realize it… Faith that the other driver on a narrow winding hilly country road will be on his side when you meet him.

I learned to drive when I was young.  As soon as I got 12 years old, my father had me do his driving for him (he was in his 60's).  So I learned to drive on a three lane state highway.  The middle lane was for passing in both directions.  In traffic, you learned to trust your life to the other guy doing the right thing.

Sometimes he didn't and the shoulder got a lot more insurance signs.  One for each death.  It does get your heart racing when you pull out into that middle lane to pass and discover that the oncoming traffic has a guy doing the same thing at the same time.  You had to be quick to stay alive.

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6 minutes ago, janice6 said:

I learned to drive when I was young.  As soon as I got 12 years old, my father had me do his driving for him (he was in his 60's).  So I learned to drive on a three lane state highway.  The middle lane was for passing in both directions.  In traffic, you learned to trust your life to the other guy doing the right thing.

Sometimes he didn't and the shoulder got a lot more insurance signs.  One for each death.  It does get your heart racing when you pull out into that middle lane to pass and discover that the oncoming traffic has a guy doing the same thing at the same time.  You had to be quick to stay alive.

For years US-11 in Virginia - Lee Highway - was three lane as described. Was known as “Bloody Lee”

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The St. Louis area had a three-lane bridge (US 40) over the Missouri river between St. Louis and St. Charles.

The open lanes had a green X, the closed lanes a red X.

Morning traffic southbound  got two lanes, evening traffic northbound got two lanes.

Though not common, there were numerous head-on collisions in the center lane every year.

I always wondered what the driver going the wrong way was possibly thinking, when the indicators were very visible even in the center of the bridge and the wrong-way driver had to notice that the cars in the center lane were going the other way.

Three lane roads in rural Missouri were common.

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11 hours ago, railfancwb said:

As far as I know cars and pickups use identical bulbs for right and left headlights. Yet when I see a vehicle with only one headlight on, the right one is most frequently not burning. Wonder why the left/right mix isn’t about 50/50?

When the Headlights went out on my 2007 Jeep Wrangler with 100.000 miles on it, BOTH headlights went out at the same time. I thought that was strange. Had to drive with the highbeams on at night until I could get them fixed so I avoided driving at night.

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9 hours ago, tous said:

The St. Louis area had a three-lane bridge (US 40) over the Missouri river between St. Louis and St. Charles.

The open lanes had a green X, the closed lanes a red X.

Morning traffic southbound  got two lanes, evening traffic northbound got two lanes.

Though not common, there were numerous head-on collisions in the center lane every year.

I always wondered what the driver going the wrong way was possibly thinking, when the indicators were very visible even in the center of the bridge and the wrong-way driver had to notice that the cars in the center lane were going the other way.

Three lane roads in rural Missouri were common.

The INFAMOUS ALLIGATOR ALLEY in South FL, before it was made into a divided 4 lane was notorious for head on crashes... 

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