Jump to content

stunning idiocy in education again...


Mrs.Cicero
 Share

Recommended Posts

So, the teacher brought cotton plants to school so the students could see and feel precisely how difficult hand processing cotton was... and now certain parents want her fired because it somehow hurt their spoiled, wussy babies emotions.  This is so freaking idiotic I can't even describe the infinite imbecility required to think like this.  

https://www.yahoo.com/news/san-francisco-teacher-under-fire-160732856.html

  • Like 3
  • Sad 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, Walt Longmire said:

Should have brought in an old growth tree and a cross cut saw so they could see how hard it was to fall one. 

My brother and I put up all our firewood for many years with a bow saw. Some of the logs we got about 6" of stroke, it was a 48" saw. My mom was terrified of chainsaws and so we were not allowed to use one. For my 18th birthday I bought myself one and never looked back, own at least a hundred now, and when mom needs anything cut she calls me.

At the steam up I've pumped water with a hand fire pumper. Helped run a steam tractor. Washed clothes by hand when I didn't have a washing machine. We always line dried anytime the weather was remotely good enough.

Then there was the putting up hay each summer, I was the auto-stacker. 

Landscaped several homes with hand tools and a wheelbarrow. Dug out basements the same way. Not to mention utility trenches. It was what we had and we got it done.

I don't regret any of it. Make my kids do some of it too.

 

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Fog said:

My brother and I put up all our firewood for many years with a bow saw. Some of the logs we got about 6" of stroke, it was a 48" saw. My mom was terrified of chainsaws and so we were not allowed to use one. For my 18th birthday I bought myself one and never looked back, own at least a hundred now, and when mom needs anything cut she calls me.

At the steam up I've pumped water with a hand fire pumper. Helped run a steam tractor. Washed clothes by hand when I didn't have a washing machine. We always line dried anytime the weather was remotely good enough.

Then there was the putting up hay each summer, I was the auto-stacker. 

Landscaped several homes with hand tools and a wheelbarrow. Dug out basements the same way. Not to mention utility trenches. It was what we had and we got it done.

I don't regret any of it. Make my kids do some of it too.

 

Are we brothers?

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/26/2022 at 12:15 PM, Fog said:

My brother and I put up all our firewood for many years with a bow saw. Some of the logs we got about 6" of stroke, it was a 48" saw. My mom was terrified of chainsaws and so we were not allowed to use one. For my 18th birthday I bought myself one and never looked back, own at least a hundred now, and when mom needs anything cut she calls me.

At the steam up I've pumped water with a hand fire pumper. Helped run a steam tractor. Washed clothes by hand when I didn't have a washing machine. We always line dried anytime the weather was remotely good enough.

Then there was the putting up hay each summer, I was the auto-stacker. 

Landscaped several homes with hand tools and a wheelbarrow. Dug out basements the same way. Not to mention utility trenches. It was what we had and we got it done.

I don't regret any of it. Make my kids do some of it too.

 

I was told that I volunteered to help my father dig out a backfilled basement in the old mansion he bought.  We cut through 3 foot thick Granite blocks to make a doorway and shoveled the 80 year old dirt into the furnace room and then into the conveyor out the window.

Don't know why, but they dug the basement, put in the granite foundation and then backfilled the basement, except for the coal furnace room and coal bin.  More of my jobs to keep the furnaces for both houses full of coal all Winter.  We switched them to oil furnaces and eventually to gas furnaces.  He believe we could do anything, so we did.l

I bet I coughed up that 80 year old dirt and crap for a week.  My father believed in hard work I guess all the depression guys did.  He believed that we could do anything.  After a baseball sized hail storm hit our houses (2) we replaced 63 windows.  

We had three 8 foot by about 4 foot stained glass windows the had some holes punched in them so he said if I could solder (ham radio experience) I could repair stained glass windows.  Got the stuff from a Minneapolis firm which had scraps from the original windows plus caning(sp).

I finally got it done and no one was the wiser.  I learned to mix boiled linseed oil and lead dust then to scrub it into the window to waterproof the lead caning and glass.

He believed that I should be able to do anything until I proved to him I couldn't.  He said if you said you can't you were a failure for not trying.  He taught me to try anything.

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Hook said:

Let me guess it was the black kids that got offended. My mom picked cotton for many years being poor white trash in Texas. 

The revised history of the world now states that only  Negroes picked cotton and did so only from 1830 until 1865.

Don't mention that cotton and the picking of has been around for 5, 000 years and has been used by many civilization, some of them Caucasian, Oriental and yes, even Negroes  that were not slaves on southern plantations in the United States in the 19th century.

You will be branded a racist and forbidden to ever speak again.

:rolleyes:

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Hook said:

Let me guess it was the black kids that got offended. My mom picked cotton for many years being poor white trash in Texas. 

It reads like it was the white mother of some mixed-race kids first.  The whole thing is so stupid.  It's a freaking cotton plant.  If you're offended by a plant, you should really go smoke one and chill for a good long time...

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Mrs.Cicero said:

It reads like it was the white mother of some mixed-race kids first.  The whole thing is so stupid.  It's a freaking cotton plant.  If you're offended by a plant, you should really go smoke one and chill for a good long time...

It must be traumatic for a mixed-race kid growing up dealing with a parent's overcompensation issues. Reaffirms my conviction that the single greatest attribute of liberalism is virtue-signaling. 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, janice6 said:

I was told that I volunteered to help my father dig out a backfilled basement in the old mansion he bought.  We cut through 3 foot thick Granite blocks to make a doorway and shoveled the 80 year old dirt into the furnace room and then into the conveyor out the window.

Don't know why, but they dug the basement, put in the granite foundation and then backfilled the basement, except for the coal furnace room and coal bin.  More of my jobs to keep the furnaces for both houses full of coal all Winter.  We switched them to oil furnaces and eventually to gas furnaces.  He believe we could do anything, so we did.l

I bet I coughed up that 80 year old dirt and crap for a week.  My father believed in hard work I guess all the depression guys did.  He believed that we could do anything.  After a baseball sized hail storm hit our houses (2) we replaced 63 windows.  

We had three 8 foot by about 4 foot stained glass windows the had some holes punched in them so he said if I could solder (ham radio experience) I could repair stained glass windows.  Got the stuff from a Minneapolis firm which had scraps from the original windows plus caning(sp).

I finally got it done and no one was the wiser.  I learned to mix boiled linseed oil and lead dust then to scrub it into the window to waterproof the lead caning and glass.

He believed that I should be able to do anything until I proved to him I couldn't.  He said if you said you can't you were a failure for not trying.  He taught me to try anything.

My brothers and I hand dug several complete septic systems for my dad. Helped build just about any project he was involved in. Houses, Shops, Churches. Haul concrete in wheel barrows for days on end. Hand split cedar shake blocks and then split them into shakes for many roofs on these projects. We were his pyramid builders. Go to the woods on weekends and 'volunteer' to do whatever job needed at his logging sites. You couldn't get kids to work like that these days with a gun to their heads.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

While I'm thinking about it...

How many people today can say they have worn out a shovel, not broken one, worn it out?

I'm working on number four. I've always been a little picky about my shovels, they have to feel right. Once they get to about two thirds of the original length I consider them worn out.

These would be the pointed digging shovels. I've gone through trenching shovels, flat shovels, scoop shovels. To say nothing of the picks, rakes, hoes, axes, mauls, sledge hammers, post hole diggers, etc.

No wonder I feel worn out some days.

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Please Donate To TBS

    Please donate to TBS.
    Your support is needed and it is greatly appreciated.
×
×
  • Create New...