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So whose garden is up already?


Mrs.Cicero
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I am currently quite jealous of my neighbor across the road, because her asparagus is already a foot high, and mine isn't even visible yet!

On a more productive note, we had my favorite kale salad for supper, (as a side to the rabbit) with kale that overwintered in my tire garden - it is kale and new potatoes (which were actually ones I harvested last fall that need to be eaten before they sprout) and tomatoes (grocery store) with a Thai Peanut Satay dressing (homemade).  Tomorrow, we will have a spinach salad with spinach that also overwintered in the tire garden.  Then we will have a lettuce-based salad with lettuce that overwintered in the tire garden... this has been the most successful year I've ever had with overwintering anything, ever.  And it was all in the tire garden, and none in the tunnel.  I think because I can't water the tunnel in the winter, so it gets too dry in there for anything to survive, but the tires get rained on and then insulated with snow.  I guess?

My strawberries survived.  The rhubarb is up (and I haven't finished eating the frozen rhubarb from last year yet).  The peas are an inch high.  The beets are NOT doing well, though.  I have no idea why.  They germinate and then disappear.  Maybe something is eating them?  The carrots are up, so I took the boards off their tires so they could get some sun and green up (the only way I've ever grown carrots successfully is by soaking the dirt, throwing the seed on, and slapping a board over top until they germinate, then taking off the board.  The pumpkins and watermelons and peppers and broccoli and cukes and zukes and maters are all still in my bathroom growing there.  And the taters need to be planted.

What are you all growing this year? Did anyone expand their garden during the shutdown?  I can't expand mine any further or I won't be able to keep it weeded...

 

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 have a bunch of stuff that is up and growing.  Kale, mesclun, parsley, basils of all kinds, shiso, tomatoes, peppers, tons of other herbs, baby lettuces, etc.  Getting ready to chuck the arugula that overwintered and probably the radicchio to make some room for other stuff.  My citrus trees are finally about to bloom for the first time.  I'm really excited about that.

 

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25 minutes ago, MO Fugga said:

The kids want a pumpkin patch for the fall. I better get busy.

I started the pumpkins for my youngest daughter - she's the one that wants to grow them, because she loves making pumpkin muffins, and cake, and bread, from scratch, and I'm more than happy to support that habit!

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23 minutes ago, Al Czervik said:

 have a bunch of stuff that is up and growing.  Kale, mesclun, parsley, basils of all kinds, shiso, tomatoes, peppers, tons of other herbs, baby lettuces, etc.  Getting ready to chuck the arugula that overwintered and probably the radicchio to make some room for other stuff.  My citrus trees are finally about to bloom for the first time.  I'm really excited about that.

 

Oooh!  Citrus trees!  I can't grow those here!  My only memory of them is of the Key Lime tree at the place my grandparents used to rent for the winter on Siesta Key - my grandma would make Key Lime pie when we visited.  I love Key lime pie...

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3 minutes ago, Batesmotel said:

I started work last fall on a raised herb garden. I still have a long way to go. So far just weeds from the soil I put in the containers. They will eventually be topped with about a foot of clean topsoil. 

image.jpg

But it looks so neat and tidy now!  I have tires, too - I put a bed sheet under mine to keep the weeds from growing up into them, and mine are filled with rabbit poop, and topped off with potting soil.  Where did you get the metal raised beds?  They don't have bottoms, do they?

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3 minutes ago, Mrs.Cicero said:

But it looks so neat and tidy now!  I have tires, too - I put a bed sheet under mine to keep the weeds from growing up into them, and mine are filled with rabbit poop, and topped off with potting soil.  Where did you get the metal raised beds?  They don't have bottoms, do they?

They are just water/feed troughs from Home Depot. Any farm supply has them. They had a solid bottom but I cut about a section about 6 inches wide out of the middle along the entire length for drainage.

The dirt in them now is extremely sandy and drains very well. It will be a good base for good clean topsoil. They work pretty good here with our dry weather and sandy soil. In wet areas with wet clay or loam underneath them they can get water bogged. 

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The garlic and onions are up. The artichokes are popping up. Rhubarb is coming on strong. Fruit trees are just starting to bloom, the early ones anyway, others are at least a month out.

Won't be long and the berries will bud out and the grapes will start waking up.

Small shoots on the elderberries.

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33 minutes ago, Mrs.Cicero said:

Oooh!  Citrus trees!  I can't grow those here!  My only memory of them is of the Key Lime tree at the place my grandparents used to rent for the winter on Siesta Key - my grandma would make Key Lime pie when we visited.  I love Key lime pie...

Supposedly, these things will survive in Zone 7, with temps down to zero.  Mine are in their third year in the ground.  We've definitely been into the teens those three years.  Can't wait for some fruit.

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6 minutes ago, Fog said:

The garlic and onions are up. The artichokes are popping up. Rhubarb is coming on strong. Fruit trees are just starting to bloom, the early ones anyway, others are at least a month out.

Won't be long and the berries will bud out and the grapes will start waking up.

Small shoots on the elderberries.

The evil birds always get the elderberries before I do!  My garlic is up - it was actually the first thing to come up this year.  I'm waiting for my lingonberry plants to arrive - they were supposed to be here last week.  I even managed to get the soil amended (when they built this house two years ago, the fill dirt around the basement was a helluva lot more base than the rest of the yard (which has always supported quite a lot of violets) - the lingonberries need the acidic soil or they die right off.  I need to test the bed where they are going one last time...

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28 minutes ago, Batesmotel said:

They are just water/feed troughs from Home Depot. Any farm supply has them. They had a solid bottom but I cut about a section about 6 inches wide out of the middle along the entire length for drainage.

The dirt in them now is extremely sandy and drains very well. It will be a good base for good clean topsoil. They work pretty good here with our dry weather and sandy soil. In wet areas with wet clay or loam underneath them they can get water bogged. 

I have one water trough that is a raised bed, but it is much shorter lengthwise than yours, and much taller in height.  The husband cut the entire bottom off of it for me (it was really rusty).  The soil here is a good loam, so it drains reasonably well, but we do get a lot of rain, and we often get it all at once.

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Our goji berries are at the second year in the ground. I read they won't really produce till the third year. We did get some figs, but hoping this year brings a bigger crop. The kiwis are leafing out, they didn't produce last year either, I guess not mature enough yet.

I can't remember off the top of my head all the berries we have in the yard. The thornless blackberries are always huge producers, berries the size of golf balls. Two kinds of raspberries, a red and a blond. The blueberries are just getting big enough to produce, hoping for a handful this year.

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1 minute ago, Mrs.Cicero said:

I have one water trough that is a raised bed, but it is much shorter lengthwise than yours, and much taller in height.  The husband cut the entire bottom off of it for me (it was really rusty).  The soil here is a good loam, so it drains reasonably well, but we do get a lot of rain, and we often get it all at once.

In the summer we can go months without appreciable rain. We get all our water between October and April from snow. We survive the summer from snowpack. 

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2 hours ago, Mrs.Cicero said:

Oooh!  Citrus trees!  I can't grow those here!  My only memory of them is of the Key Lime tree at the place my grandparents used to rent for the winter on Siesta Key - my grandma would make Key Lime pie when we visited.  I love Key lime pie...

I grew up on Siesta Key. Hope it's still nice. For some reason, I can't post pics here. Had my Goldschlager bottle full of the whitest sand on Earth....

Edited by MO Fugga
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My wife has hers started and is working on more. The more she wants the more work for me.

She is 69 and small framed so I have to do the heavy lifting!

Just got 10 50lb bags of mulch for the front of the house, I had to carry them and now she wants 10 more!

Her hobby is working my butt off!

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10 hours ago, Fog said:

Our goji berries are at the second year in the ground. I read they won't really produce till the third year. We did get some figs, but hoping this year brings a bigger crop. The kiwis are leafing out, they didn't produce last year either, I guess not mature enough yet.

I can't remember off the top of my head all the berries we have in the yard. The thornless blackberries are always huge producers, berries the size of golf balls. Two kinds of raspberries, a red and a blond. The blueberries are just getting big enough to produce, hoping for a handful this year.

When we moved here, the tunnel was full of figs, but in the first 4 years, we got... one fig.  Most of the plants never produced any, and the two that did never had many, and I finally gave up on them, tore them out, and use the tunnel for annual veggies now.  The cukes, peppers, maters, and beans love the additional heat the tunnel provides.  This year I put some planters down the center aisle that I will move outside in May, because they are full of spinach and lettuce and stuff that won't handle the extra heat in May, but the tunnel does let me start those earlier than they would come up if I planted them outside to start with.  I want to try hardy kiwis at some point.  I don't know if they'd do better in the tunnel, or not.  And I wish I had thornless berries - I have wild blackberries and black raspberries everywhere... and they are thorny as hell... which doesn't prevent us from picking them and making jam, but does make it rather more painful if you aren't very careful!

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5 hours ago, DWARREN123 said:

My wife has hers started and is working on more. The more she wants the more work for me.

She is 69 and small framed so I have to do the heavy lifting!

Just got 10 50lb bags of mulch for the front of the house, I had to carry them and now she wants 10 more!

Her hobby is working my butt off!

I like that!  I have to carry my own 50# bags 'cause the husband is at work.  Sometimes I make the kids do it, and the youngest yells about how she's lifting half her weight...

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We're in 6A here so a long time to go before my Cherokee Purple plants can go in the ground.

I could weed and prep the garden to get it ready but procrastination is higher on my list than weeding.

Edited by Peng
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11 hours ago, Mrs.Cicero said:

When we moved here, the tunnel was full of figs, but in the first 4 years, we got... one fig.  Most of the plants never produced any, and the two that did never had many, and I finally gave up on them, tore them out, and use the tunnel for annual veggies now.  The cukes, peppers, maters, and beans love the additional heat the tunnel provides.  This year I put some planters down the center aisle that I will move outside in May, because they are full of spinach and lettuce and stuff that won't handle the extra heat in May, but the tunnel does let me start those earlier than they would come up if I planted them outside to start with.  I want to try hardy kiwis at some point.  I don't know if they'd do better in the tunnel, or not.  And I wish I had thornless berries - I have wild blackberries and black raspberries everywhere... and they are thorny as hell... which doesn't prevent us from picking them and making jam, but does make it rather more painful if you aren't very careful!

 

The thorny berries have better flavor, fuller and sweeter, trade off is a smaller berry and you donate blood to get them.

I had a wild patch in the corner of the yard that I cultivated for years. But when I put the addition on the chicken mansion I had to cut the patch back so far that I decided to take them out. There is no shortage of wild blackberries within walking distance.

You ever eat a marion berry? 

 

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10 hours ago, Fog said:

 

The thorny berries have better flavor, fuller and sweeter, trade off is a smaller berry and you donate blood to get them.

I had a wild patch in the corner of the yard that I cultivated for years. But when I put the addition on the chicken mansion I had to cut the patch back so far that I decided to take them out. There is no shortage of wild blackberries within walking distance.

You ever eat a marion berry? 

 

I've never eaten a marionberry.  I've seen the plants in my gardening catalogs, but that is as close as I've ever come.  Are they any good?

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Delicious. Very sweet, but full of flavor too.

I grew up surrounded by hundreds of acres of them. I can tell you for a fact that you can eat enough to be sick of them, but it takes an awful lot of them to get there. 

 

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