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On 7/24/2022 at 8:10 AM, Schmidt Meister said:

I'll bet it ran quiet ...

1900 1681658594823.jpg

There used to be one like that in Springdale, Arkansas right on 71 business.

On 7/24/2022 at 8:10 AM, Schmidt Meister said:

1900 p262.jpg

I actually kinda like this one. The little boy in me thinks it is cool.

On 7/19/2022 at 8:52 PM, janice6 said:

Lack of experienced Boilermen make this very dangerous now. 

Boiler repairs and maintenance required a good working knowledge of extremely high pressures and metal expansion and contraction, to safely work on/with them.

I read a 1900's manual on boiler repair (such as a locomotive boiler) and the techniques are fascinating.  Repairing cracks is almost an art form.

There’s a skill to high pressure welding.  I’d probably come closest to doing it TIG, but I wouldn’t want to be responsible with  my current skill level.

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6 hours ago, Silentpoet said:

There used to be one like that in Springdale, Arkansas right on 71 business.

I actually kinda like this one. The little boy in me thinks it is cool.

There’s a skill to high pressure welding.  I’d probably come closest to doing it TIG, but I wouldn’t want to be responsible with  my current skill level.

One solution that struck me particularly was for fixing a small crack or hole. 

You take a large steel disk and cup it as if it were almost a hemisphere.  Then you gas weld it (almost all the welding was gas back then) to the boiler wall  over the hole or crack.  Then while it's still very hot (red or yellow), you strike it with a hammer to depress the raised center.

You got inside the boiler housing to do this.

This gives it excess material so it can expand and contract with the boiler and not break away from the wall.  Cool stuff.

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6 hours ago, Silentpoet said:

There used to be one like that in Springdale, Arkansas right on 71 business.

I actually kinda like this one. The little boy in me thinks it is cool.

There’s a skill to high pressure welding.  I’d probably come closest to doing it TIG, but I wouldn’t want to be responsible with  my current skill level.

One of my uncles went many places in the free world welding piping for nuclear power plants and training local employees to do that level of work.

A specialty hobby is live steam model railroading. Approved and certified welded boilers similar in size to the one on the motorcycle are made by a number of people. 

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Chattanooga March 2015. Celebrating the return of 4501 to steam. The miniature is 1.5” = 1’ scale on 7-1/2” gauge track. Boiler pressure for the miniature is in the 100 to 125 psi while the full size is probably 250 psi. 

38FCD1AC-72DE-4BE4-B8E4-E307CC624FE1.jpeg

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1947 Chrysler Saratoga/New Yorker - Zippo Car

Inventor of the Zippo lighter and founder of Zippo Manufacturing Company, George G. Blaisdell, loved automobiles as much as he loved his world-famous windproof lighter. As a young man, Mr. Blaisdell was impressed by a parade of "productmobiles" - incredible vehicles that resembled the products they represented. After the incredible success of Zippo after WWII, he set out to create his own "productmobile" in the image of the iconic Zippo lighter.
On June 16, 1947, Zippo purchased a 1947 Chrysler Saratoga for $2,048. Blaisdell envisioned a car that looked like a Zippo lighter. He hired Gardner Display of Pittsburgh to design the vehicle, a 1947 Chrysler Saratoga with larger-than-life lighters stretching above the roof line, complete with removable neon flames. The lids of the lighters snapped shut for travel. The word Zippo was painted on the side in 24-karat gold. The total cost to transform the vehicle into two towering windproof lighters was $25,000. Through the late ‘40s and early ‘50s, the Zippo Car traveled to all 48 contiguous states, participating in special events, trade expos, fairs and leading parades. Unfortunately, due to the weight of the modified chassis, the Zippo Car experienced frequent tire blow outs. The car was sent in to a dealership in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for repairs, but due to the projected cost of resolving the issues, the project was put on hold indefinitely. The car remained at the dealership, awaiting its fate.
In the early 1970s, Mr. Blaisdell went back to Pittsburgh to retrieve the car, only to find that the dealership had gone out of business, leaving no trace of the Zippo Car. To this day, the fate of the original Zippo Car remains a mystery.
In 1996, Zippo purchased a grey 1947 Chrysler New Yorker and began restoration of another Zippo Car to mirror the original with additional features. Eighteen months later, the task was completed with a price tag around $250,000. By 1998, the Zippo Car was back in action once again traveling the country. The Zippo Car now participates in parades, corporate sponsored events, tradeshows, and much more.
The Zippo Car continues to drive home the classic message of style, quality, and dependability while traveling the United States coast to coast. When not on the road, the Zippo Car can be found at the Zippo/Case Museum in Bradford, Pennsylvania.

 

1947 Chrysler Saratoga:New Yorker - Zippo Car.jpg

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