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Amphibious training accident for West Coast Marines


Fnfalman
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Always hated floating in one of those... invariably overloaded, diesel fumes, no movement possible, tossed around by King Neptune. Everyone aboard should have had an inflatable life preserver, but actually getting everyone clear of a sinking vehicle is problematic. The force of the water rushing into a crowded troop compartment would be formidable. Prayers for the missing and injured... gratitude for the service of those who passed. Semper Fidelis.

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12 hours ago, TXUSMC said:

Always hated floating in one of those... invariably overloaded, diesel fumes, no movement possible, tossed around by King Neptune. Everyone aboard should have had an inflatable life preserver, but actually getting everyone clear of a sinking vehicle is problematic. The force of the water rushing into a crowded troop compartment would be formidable. Prayers for the missing and injured... gratitude for the service of those who passed. Semper Fidelis.

 

I can imagine.  What a terrible way to go, drowning scares the crap out of me.  Amazing those things float at all.

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They're all dead. 

Those things are little more than poorly maintained self propelled caskets. They leak copious amounts of seawater at all times, the pumps are prone to failure, they are about 50 years old, and are operated beyond their limits. I hated riding in those things. The 1833s were all crazy as far as I was concerned. It's mass burial at sea when those things go down.

My sympathies to the Marines and the Corpsman. My utter contempt to the HQMC for spending billions on VSTOL aircraft that are unnecessary and failing to fix the known problems with the AAV.

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Will be interesting to see what the accident investigation turns up?Human error? Mechanical malfunction? Too early to speculate, not knowing the vehicle age, refit history, and maintenance record, and the crew training record.

I remember being flown in CH-46 helicopters before I retired in the '90s, and ALL of them were Vietnam "veterans"... and had the bullet hole patches to prove it. They were in the inventory for the better part of 50 years... the USMC definitely got their money's worth from those airframes. I imagine the USMC "reworked" the amtracs in a similar fashion. The current P-7 models have been in the inventory, in one form or another, since the '70s.

Ironically, the WWII versions had open air troop compartments. 

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1 hour ago, Historian said:

God bless them.  They were at the height of their lives. 

It is way too easy for many Americans to lump service men and women into one cohort and assume they volunteered for duty for the same or similar reasons. Their reasons for raising their right hand and swearing an oath of enlistment are many, and it never ceased to amaze me that young Americans of such dissimilar backgrounds could bond together as a platoon or a section and develop a bond that would last beyond the length of their service. And when you lose one of them, much less eight, it hurts like hell. My heart goes out to every Marine and corpsman who is left to carry on with a heavy heart. And condolences to the families of those who are now guarding the streets of Heaven. Semper Fi.

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59 minutes ago, TXUSMC said:

It is way too easy for many Americans to lump service men and women into one cohort and assume they volunteered for duty for the same or similar reasons. Their reasons for raising their right hand and swearing an oath of enlistment are many, and it never ceased to amaze me that young Americans of such dissimilar backgrounds could bond together as a platoon or a section and develop a bond that would last beyond the length of their service. And when you lose one of them, much less eight, it hurts like hell. My heart goes out to every Marine and corpsman who is left to carry on with a heavy heart. And condolences to the families of those who are now guarding the streets of Heaven. Semper Fi.

Well...don't think it could have been said  better.

The all have one thing in common.  The chose to do this.  It's part of what makes America great. We have people who will do the hardest things...and then thank us for the chance to have lived a life with purpose.

And that's why it hurts.

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