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Buffalo Officials Duped By Professional Antifa Provocateur


pipedreams
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"In this slow motion video, you will see Gugino using a phone as a capture scanner.  You might have heard the term “skimming”; it’s essentially the same.  Watch him use his right hand to first scan the mic of officer one (top left of chest).  Then Gugino moves his hand to the communications belt of the second officer. WATCH CLOSELY:"

"The capture of communications signals [explained in detail here] is a method of police tracking used by Antifa to monitor the location of police. "

https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2020/06/06/buffalo-officials-duped-by-professional-antifa-provocateur-arrest-and-charge-two-police-officers-righteous-police-team-stand-together-and-walk-out/amp/

 

73239137dd303b9c.jpeg?1591726930

Edited by pipedreams
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You can download software to your phone that allows you to "clone" the frequency and signal of a device.

Once the frequency is captured (ie cloned) you can track the device, duplicate the signal and/or listen to a transmission.

 

Using my smartphone I can sit down in my favorite coffee shop and within a minute tell you the brand name and IP address of their router and the IP address of every device in the place.  Including is it a iPhone  or Android and the name they gave their device. You can also do the same with Bluetooth devices. This can be done with a free app that readily available, can't imagine what can be done with more complex apps.

 

You might start here and do a bit of research.

The 6 Best Police Scanner Apps for Android & iPhone

https://www.ratedradardetector.org/police-scanner/best-app/

Software-Defined Radio with Android Smartphones

https://www.electronicsforu.com/electronics-projects/software-defined-radio-with-android-smartphones

 

 

 

Edited by pipedreams
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Just some thoughts.  I put in bold a few important things not to be rude...but to simplify your reading.  It's about to get technical.

In order to capture a frequency you need two things.

1. It has to be transmitting within the transmitting and receiving range of the transceiver (cop radio)
2. You have to have a receiver than hear the frequency the cop radio is transmitting on.

So let's see if we can do that with a cell phone.

The frequencies for cell 4G Cell phones are:

700 Mhz (band)
800 Mhz (band)
1900 Mhz (band)

The FCC limits public safety to the following:

25-50 MHz        (VHF Low Band)
6.3 MHz
150-174 MHz         (VHF High Band)
3.6 MHz            [non-contiguous]
220-222            (220 MHz band)
0.1 MHz
450-470            (UHF Band)
3.7 MHz            [non-contiguous]

470-512 MHz        (T-Band)
6 to 12 MHz blocks    [contiguous in specified markets]
[Licensing freeze in effect.  See FCC T-Band Fact Sheet]

 

758-769/788-799 MHz    (700 Broadband)
22 MHz(11 MHz x 11 MHz)    [contiguous]
768-775/798-805        (700 Narrowband)[1]
14 MHz (7 MHz x 7 MHz)    [contiguous]
 
806-809/851-854 MHz    (NPSPAC Band)
6 MHz (3 MHz x 3 MHz)    [contiguous]
809-815/854-860 MHz    (800 MHz Band)
3.5 MHz    (1.75 MHz x 1.75 MHz)    [non-contiguous]
 
4940-4990 MHz        (4.9 GHz Band)
50 MHz            [contiguous]
5850-5925 MHz band    (5.9 GHz Band)
75 MHz            [contiguous]

There isn't an overlap between the transmit and receive of a cell phone and public safety.    The FCC has put them in different frequencies and bands to keep them apart and reduce congestion.

You can't scan and grab the frequency your cell phone can't hear

Even if you could that's such a large amount of frequency space it would require time to scan the frequency and lock.  He didn't have enough time to do that.

But wait...it's easier than you think you can just google your city's frequencies and find out what they are?  They are a public record.  

Why not just go buy a Bearcat scanner? That will do everything you need from the safety of miles away from the cops. 

And if he was go to the SDR route...the amount of time setting that up would be...long...I've done it...and you are still limited to what your SDR chip/radio can do for you.  You're basically turning your cell phone into a screen for a radio.   You might get some public safety out of it...depends on the radio but those $20 radios (like in the video) are monumental crap and that antenna is better used as a tooth pick.  This is beyond impractical for what people are suggesting.   More over it's physically impossible to press all the buttons required to make the system work while dealing with a cop.

Just for the record real SDR radio starts at $1,000 and is not attached to a cell phone. 

And even if you did this...you could do it from anywhere.  Why do try to do it from the non-transmitting radio on the officer?  Even if you device could make the radio receive and transmit you're only going to get that one spot on the frequency band.   You'd have to sweep the band to find any of the frequencies in use...and that would take more time than you saw.  

Tactical channels:  It dawns on me some departments have silent tactical channels that run spread spectrum technology to avoid ease dropping on sensitive matters.   No scanner you have or can by over the counter will be able to follow that as they won't know the random sequence selected.  It will change faster than they can adapt.  But that's only a few channels.

This guy was filming them....

Further more:  I bet dollars to donuts those cops didn't think he might be looking to frequency capture.   It was the last thing on their mind.  Cops are rarely radio junkies like me.

Just some thoughts.  You may now flame me.

Edited by Historian
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59 minutes ago, Historian said:

Just some thoughts.  I put in bold a few important things not to be rude...but to simplify your reading.  It's about to get technical.

In order to capture a frequency you need two things.

1. It has to be transmitting within the transmitting and receiving range of the transceiver (cop radio)
2. You have to have a receiver than hear the frequency the cop radio is transmitting on.

So let's see if we can do that with a cell phone.

The frequencies for cell 4G Cell phones are:

700 Mhz (band)
800 Mhz (band)
1900 Mhz (band)

The FCC limits public safety to the following:

25-50 MHz        (VHF Low Band)
6.3 MHz
150-174 MHz         (VHF High Band)
3.6 MHz            [non-contiguous]
220-222            (220 MHz band)
0.1 MHz
450-470            (UHF Band)
3.7 MHz            [non-contiguous]

470-512 MHz        (T-Band)
6 to 12 MHz blocks    [contiguous in specified markets]
[Licensing freeze in effect.  See FCC T-Band Fact Sheet]

 

758-769/788-799 MHz    (700 Broadband)
22 MHz(11 MHz x 11 MHz)    [contiguous]
768-775/798-805        (700 Narrowband)[1]
14 MHz (7 MHz x 7 MHz)    [contiguous]
 
806-809/851-854 MHz    (NPSPAC Band)
6 MHz (3 MHz x 3 MHz)    [contiguous]
809-815/854-860 MHz    (800 MHz Band)
3.5 MHz    (1.75 MHz x 1.75 MHz)    [non-contiguous]
 
4940-4990 MHz        (4.9 GHz Band)
50 MHz            [contiguous]
5850-5925 MHz band    (5.9 GHz Band)
75 MHz            [contiguous]

There isn't an overlap between the transmit and receive of a cell phone and public safety.    The FCC has put them in different frequencies and bands to keep them apart and reduce congestion.

You can't scan and grab the frequency your cell phone can't hear

Even if you could that's such a large amount of frequency space it would require time to scan the frequency and lock.  He didn't have enough time to do that.

But wait...it's easier than you think you can just google your city's frequencies and find out what they are?  They are a public record.  

Why not just go buy a Bearcat scanner? That will do everything you need from the safety of miles away from the cops. 

And if he was go to the SDR route...the amount of time setting that up would be...long...I've done it...and you are still limited to what your SDR chip/radio can do for you.  You're basically turning your cell phone into a screen for a radio.   You might get some public safety out of it...depends on the radio but those $20 radios (like in the video) are monumental crap and that antenna is better used as a tooth pick.  This is beyond impractical for what people are suggesting.   More over it's physically impossible to press all the buttons required to make the system work while dealing with a cop.

Just for the record real SDR radio starts at $1,000 and is not attached to a cell phone. 

And even if you did this...you could do it from anywhere.  Why do try to do it from the non-transmitting radio on the officer?  Even if you device could make the radio receive and transmit you're only going to get that one spot on the frequency band.   You'd have to sweep the band to find any of the frequencies in use...and that would take more time than you saw.  

Tactical channels:  It dawns on me some departments have silent tactical channels that run spread spectrum technology to avoid ease dropping on sensitive matters.   No scanner you have or can by over the counter will be able to follow that as they won't know the random sequence selected.  It will change faster than they can adapt.  But that's only a few channels.

This guy was filming them....

Further more:  I bet dollars to donuts those cops didn't think he might be looking to frequency capture.   It was the last thing on their mind.  Cops are rarely radio junkies like me.

Just some thoughts.  You may now flame me.

No reason to flame, good information.  I don't think some people understand smartphones are more than a phone and they are capable of a great deal.  Just because he was old doesn't mean he's dumb.  With recent advancements in smartphone technology and availability of affordable smartphones, developers have started working on SDR support for mobile phones.

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1 hour ago, Historian said:

Just some thoughts.  I put in bold a few important things not to be rude...but to simplify your reading.  It's about to get technical.

In order to capture a frequency you need two things.

1. It has to be transmitting within the transmitting and receiving range of the transceiver (cop radio)
2. You have to have a receiver than hear the frequency the cop radio is transmitting on.

So let's see if we can do that with a cell phone.

The frequencies for cell 4G Cell phones are:

700 Mhz (band)
800 Mhz (band)
1900 Mhz (band)

The FCC limits public safety to the following:

25-50 MHz        (VHF Low Band)
6.3 MHz
150-174 MHz         (VHF High Band)
3.6 MHz            [non-contiguous]
220-222            (220 MHz band)
0.1 MHz
450-470            (UHF Band)
3.7 MHz            [non-contiguous]

470-512 MHz        (T-Band)
6 to 12 MHz blocks    [contiguous in specified markets]
[Licensing freeze in effect.  See FCC T-Band Fact Sheet]

 

758-769/788-799 MHz    (700 Broadband)
22 MHz(11 MHz x 11 MHz)    [contiguous]
768-775/798-805        (700 Narrowband)[1]
14 MHz (7 MHz x 7 MHz)    [contiguous]
 
806-809/851-854 MHz    (NPSPAC Band)
6 MHz (3 MHz x 3 MHz)    [contiguous]
809-815/854-860 MHz    (800 MHz Band)
3.5 MHz    (1.75 MHz x 1.75 MHz)    [non-contiguous]
 
4940-4990 MHz        (4.9 GHz Band)
50 MHz            [contiguous]
5850-5925 MHz band    (5.9 GHz Band)
75 MHz            [contiguous]

There isn't an overlap between the transmit and receive of a cell phone and public safety.    The FCC has put them in different frequencies and bands to keep them apart and reduce congestion.

You can't scan and grab the frequency your cell phone can't hear

Even if you could that's such a large amount of frequency space it would require time to scan the frequency and lock.  He didn't have enough time to do that.

But wait...it's easier than you think you can just google your city's frequencies and find out what they are?  They are a public record.  

Why not just go buy a Bearcat scanner? That will do everything you need from the safety of miles away from the cops. 

And if he was go to the SDR route...the amount of time setting that up would be...long...I've done it...and you are still limited to what your SDR chip/radio can do for you.  You're basically turning your cell phone into a screen for a radio.   You might get some public safety out of it...depends on the radio but those $20 radios (like in the video) are monumental crap and that antenna is better used as a tooth pick.  This is beyond impractical for what people are suggesting.   More over it's physically impossible to press all the buttons required to make the system work while dealing with a cop.

Just for the record real SDR radio starts at $1,000 and is not attached to a cell phone. 

And even if you did this...you could do it from anywhere.  Why do try to do it from the non-transmitting radio on the officer?  Even if you device could make the radio receive and transmit you're only going to get that one spot on the frequency band.   You'd have to sweep the band to find any of the frequencies in use...and that would take more time than you saw.  

Tactical channels:  It dawns on me some departments have silent tactical channels that run spread spectrum technology to avoid ease dropping on sensitive matters.   No scanner you have or can by over the counter will be able to follow that as they won't know the random sequence selected.  It will change faster than they can adapt.  But that's only a few channels.

This guy was filming them....

Further more:  I bet dollars to donuts those cops didn't think he might be looking to frequency capture.   It was the last thing on their mind.  Cops are rarely radio junkies like me.

Just some thoughts.  You may now flame me.

Thank you, excellent explanation 

.

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1 hour ago, pipedreams said:

No reason to flame, good information.  I don't think some people understand smartphones are more than a phone and they are capable of a great deal.  Just because he was old doesn't mean he's dumb.  With recent advancements in smartphone technology and availability of affordable smartphones, developers have started working on SDR support for mobile phones.

Thank you Pipe.    I was expecting someone to tell me to put on my flame retardant BVDs.

I agree with your comment about his age.  Having a lot of time in patrol....you are right...old people can sometimes be just as dangerous as an 18 year-old. 

You are right cell phones can do a lot of things. Most people don't have a clue what they can do. 

Just to clear somethings up that i missed:   SDR radios are physical radios who have some traditional parts replaced by software.   If you watch the video provided you'll see a little rectangular thing with an antenna attached.  That's a Crapa-Tronics SDR with a useless antenna.

Cell phone applications for SDRs have been around for almost eight years now.  If not longer.  SDR software won't make something like a cell phone transmit and receive outside of it's limitations.

But he couldn't not have scanned all the frequencies in time to hit the ground.   I just scanned the entire 144mhz band and it took my PC and radio (not a cheap $20 SDR) about four minutes to cover entire band in small "step increases."

For those interested in the radios take a look at this.  This is part of a system i built to bring in hi definition NOAA weather data.  It's $37 bucks on Amazon.
NooElec NESDR Smart XTR SDR - Premium RTL-SDR w/Extended Tuning Range, Aluminum Enclosure, 0.5PPM TCXO, SMA Input. RTL2832U & E4000-Based Software Defined Radio

The one in the video is similar to this one at $24
Nooelec NESDR Mini 2+ 0.5PPM TCXO RTL-SDR & ADS-B USB Receiver Set w/Antenna, Suction Mount, Female SMA Adapter & Remote Control, RTL2832U & R820T2 Tuner. Low-Cost Software Defined Radio.

If you want to see what a nice SDR looks like take a look at Flex Radio.   And these are ham radios.  Although, you could run a third world radio network with them without a problem.

I'll go read a history book now and stop bothering you guys.  ?

Edited by Historian
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33 minutes ago, Dric902 said:

Is there any actual evidence that he had anything other than the Bluetooth turned on and discoverable?

cause this is some Alex Jones crap here. I’m glad the old hippie didn’t have a plasma rifle in the 40 watt range

 

.

Bluetooh is very short and on a very select frequency.  

Interesting thing was it was developed by Nokia.   And named for the Viking King who first created a standard written language for Vikings.

Herald BlueTooth.  Even the symbol on your device...is Herald's initials.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harald_Bluetooth

There's your history in this thread. 

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11 hours ago, Historian said:

Thank you Pipe.    I was expecting someone to tell me to put on my flame retardant BVDs.

I agree with your comment about his age.  Having a lot of time in patrol....you are right...old people can sometimes be just as dangerous as an 18 year-old. 

You are right cell phones can do a lot of things. Most people don't have a clue what they can do. 
?

I got sucked into believing the video and link but when I'm wrong, I'm wrong.  This guy is a long term trouble maker and got his butt handed to him.   For all the officers to resign from the unit there must be a lot more going on than said in public.  One thing we are all assuming is the device he was holding was a cell phone, do we know that to be true?  I know that's reaching a bit, but there is a lot tech out there depending on how much you want to spend. 

Interesting you mention Nokia since they provide me with my monthly retirement check.

Edited by pipedreams
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10 hours ago, pipedreams said:

I got sucked into believing the video and link but when I'm wrong, I'm wrong.  This guy is a long term trouble maker and got his butt handed to him.   For all the officers to resign from the unit there must be a lot more going on than said in public.  One thing we are all assuming is the device he was holding was a cell phone, do we know that to be true?  I know that's reaching a bit, but there is a lot tech out there depending on how much you want to spend. 

Interesting you mention Nokia since they provide me with my monthly retirement check.

Pipe i've fallen for stuff, too.   

That guy could have been anything but a cell phone is my bet.   I think he was looking to film names, badges and equipment for some reason later.  

Whatever it was.  I think he made contact with someone...and thus ended up right there on the ground. 

It doesn't look like any hand held electric weapon i'm aware of.

And like i said...why attempt to scan the frequencies in use...when you can look them up.

Whatever happened there.  He shouldn't have been there.  And he isn't very smart.

And i can't blame the crew for not wanting that detail.   They hung those two cops out before they got a full story.  I've got 10...maybe 15 years left...and when i'm done i'll treasure my service in uniform.  But won't look back.

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bottom line is the Old Hippie should have moved when the Crowd Control was coming towards him, the First line of Crowd Control wont wait for you they don't break the line.

that's why the next line is "Compliance" and EMT.

he was in enough of these to know the routine and the repercussions (or Concussions) if you don't

if he is going to use the "but i parked my car over there" Excuse it wont work either.

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