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Guess this forum includes EMT's.  Anyway I was in the first group of EMT's to go through training at Marion General Hospital in 1972.  I was a college student, and had worked in the Emergency Room as an orderly for about 2 years when the hospital took over ambulance service for the county.  I not only got my training tuition free, I was on the clock during classroom hours.  We rolled out January 1, 1972, and I made the first 2nd shift run of the service, as an attendant.  I spent the next two years working all three shifts at different times.  When I graduated from college I left the hospital behind.  It was a great experience, not easy but it helped me get perspective on life in general. 

 

The photo is a copy form the local paper.  Two young men were boating and got swept over a dam.  The one in the photo survived, the other did not.  We picked him up about 2 hours later when he was found by the fire dept dive team. 

That's me in the middle.  I know I look like I was about 14 in the picture, but I was 22. 

 

 

 

 

Charles Mill Damn.jpg

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I have been a EMT since 95 and a medic for 17 years as a firefighter. Rewarding career with its ups and downs. Thanks for serving.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

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When I joined the FD in 1978, I was in the first class that included EMT certification in rookie school. Our training officers told us that the FD would be taking over the city contracted ambulance service and we would likely be assigned to an ambulance. It never happened and we eventually evolved into a paramedic program. 

I worked for the ambulance service after graduation on my days off and the EMT’s there knew of the city’s plans. They had been given the impression that a magic wand would be waved and they would change uniforms and be then become firefighters with all benefits and pension. They were grossly mislead. My state has requirements that have to be met with physicals and testing before you can added to our pension system. 99% of them would have never made it. 

Later on, that Ambulance service went under and another one took its place. 

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Nice! I recall getting into the local paper a few times in the middle of someone else's really bad day. There's a scrapbook somewhere that isn't 3am-worthy. Spent almost ten years on the bandaid box. It kicked off one helluva career, a few college degrees, a couple professional certifications, some proud moments, a few heartbreaks, and friendships with some of the best people I've ever met.

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