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Eric

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2 hours ago, pipedreams said:

A sound-triggered camera captures the Delta IV Heavy launch of the NROL-37 satellite on June 11, 2016. The camera was placed at the launchpad prior to launch and survived, even though it was just several hundred feet from the rocket.

Photograph by John Kraus

 

Screenshot_2020-02-08 This Teenager Photographs Dramatic Rocket Launches.jpg

Reminds me of one of my bad days at work.

We never did figure out where those acetylene bottles went to.

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2 hours ago, railfancwb said:

Where I used to work we usually had a tall bottle of helium and another of nitrogen. Periodically I had to remind people to secure those in an upright position, as we had all the doorways we needed in that room. 

We had a Semiconductor line and a high vacuum deposition facilities.  With those we had some of the most deadly gasses known for "doping" the semiconductors in process.

I worked there for 40 years and we never had a single mishap.  Everyone that handled them in high pressure cylinders (some the size of a thermos bottle) appreciated that they were so deadly, you couldn't evacuate fast enough.  So they were careful.

We did have a siren that went off if the gas were detected.  It simply meant this is the last thing you will hear before you die.

Edited by janice6
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2 hours ago, Huaco Kid said:

I worked in a lab that had a halon fire suppression system

On one of my first days,  I was told,  "That means the equipment is more valuable than you are."

When I first started at UNIVAC the tube computers had air conditioning to keep them working.

The people didn't deserve such luxurious treatment till many years later.

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10 hours ago, janice6 said:

We had a Semiconductor line and a high vacuum deposition facilities.  With those we had some of the most deadly gasses known for "doping" the semiconductors in process.

I worked there for 40 years and we never had a single mishap.  Everyone that handled them in high pressure cylinders (some the size of a thermos bottle) appreciated that they were so deadly, you couldn't evacuate fast enough.  So they were careful.

We did have a siren that went off if the gas were detected.  It simply meant this is the last thing you will hear before you die.

Gotta love the stuff that goes into making semiconductors.  Arsine, phosphine, boron trichloride, phosphorus oxychloride, and everyone's favorite pyrophoric gas, 100% silane!  Along with sulfuric, hydrofluoric, aqua regia...  What a fun industry!  (Truth be told, I very much enjoyed the six years I worked at National Semi, and likely would have stayed longer if they hadn't closed the plant in 1990.  Learned a LOT working there, and it's served me well since.)

-Pat

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