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Durable Products That Deliver No Matter How Old They Are


pipedreams
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7 hours ago, pipedreams said:

Lunch Box From ‘89. Thermos From ‘97. New Old Stock.

Lunch Box From ‘89. Thermos From ‘97. New Old Stock. I’m So Excited

 

2 hours ago, Historian said:

Someone beat me to the Stanley thermos.   I have two...and they are amazing.  Also have the big metal lunch box.   Fantastic for packing lunch to work.

1940s Vibroplex bug.
Vibroplex Original Bug - AI4FR

Vintage Gillette DE 1931 Special Goodwill Gold Open Comb Safety Razor |  #470263405

My regular razor.  1930s Gillette.

 

I have my father's Stanley Thermos that he carried coffee in to work at the shipyard, and water when we would cut and haul firewood when I was a kid. It sits on a shelf in my garage next to his Stihl 041AV that still runs like top. Next month will be 20 years since he passed away. There could be a Ferrari in my garage and that shelf would still be more valuable to me.

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6 minutes ago, jfost11 said:

 

I have my father's Stanley Thermos that he carried coffee in to work at the shipyard, and water when we would cut and haul firewood when I was a kid. It sits on a shelf in my garage next to his Stihl 041AV that still runs like top. Next month will be 20 years since he passed away. There could be a Ferrari in my garage and that shelf would still be more valuable to me.

It's hard to explain how there are so many stories about those green thermoses.

They are wonderful at what they do.  But they are such a personal item.  That has to be the origin of the stories. 

I love mine.  And they are so affordable if by chance you need one of your own.

 

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1 hour ago, crockett said:

Its a photo I took years ago when I installed it. And I have a vacuum under the table that removes any dust from de-capping. I reload in my ACed reloading room. There is no grime or dust anywhere.

A clean desk is a sign of a sick mind.  😷

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I will NOT admit to how many of those antique Singers I own. (I learned to sew on a 1963 Featherweight that still sews perfectly - it is sitting across the room from me now). 

My husband and youngest daughter want one of those anvils... 

I'm waiting for someone to post a pic of their Lodge cast iron pans.  

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My parents bought a GE refrigerator in 1948 when I was a year old. Ten years later we moved to a bigger 2 story house that my dad had built for $15,000 dollars and a year later his company, bell aircraft, went out of business so we moved to Los Angeles where He Got a job with Lockheed in Burbank and we rented a house for a year and used that refrigerator there. Then in 1960 we bought a house and they bought a new refrigerator and moved the GE to the garage. Then, 15 yrs years after that, They moved from L.A. to Placerville in Northern Cal after my Dad retired and bought a house there and moved the GE refrigerator to be use in the garage and the new house had it's own refrigerator in the kitchen.

Then about 20 years after that, The old GE was still running when my parents sold the house in Northern Cal and and move to an assisted living facility here in Washington state and as far as I know, that refrigerator might still be running today.

Here is a picture of a 1948 GE refrigerator exactly like the one my parents had.

1GE.jpg

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2 hours ago, Huaco Kid said:

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That's not just a Zippo. But a crackle Zippo.  Those were produced during WWII and sometimes in Korea.

Made by the same company as Case Pocket Knives.  Don't one?  Go buy one. Best common folder ever.

The Case Stockman.

Amazon.com: CASE XX WR Pocket Knife Brown Synthetic Jigged Small Stockman  Item #081 - (6333 SS) - Length Closed: 2 5/8 Inches : Sports & Outdoors

 

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21 hours ago, Batesmotel said:

Estwing hammers

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I did carpentry starting back in the 70's before nail guns came into use,  I used a Vaughn 20 ounce smooth face straight claw for everything. I had one job early on where I helped build a 2 story house from the ground up and after a couple of days of nailing up sheer wall I could pound nails without bending them. The old timers said that wood handles were better than steel handles because the wood would adsorb some of the shock from pounding nails and your wrists wouldn't get as sore by the end of the day. Eventually I did get a 24 ounce Estwing framing hammer and I still have that hammer today along wth my Vaughn which I've changed handles on about 4-5 times.

Eventually I started using a nail gun but I also did a few demolition jobs and the big Estwing was handy for pulling nails and breaking things apart, like stucco walls.  I've always preferred straight claw hammer because with a long handle they're good for scratching your back.

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2 hours ago, Borg warner said:

The old timers said that wood handles were better than steel handles because the wood would adsorb some of the shock from pounding nails and your wrists wouldn't get as sore by the end of the day.

Very true. My elbow was the problem. When I framed by hand, Vaughn was my favorite. I like Estwing because the heads don’t come lose. That is a real issue in a dry climate.

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On 9/13/2021 at 10:21 PM, Rellik said:

A clean desk is a sign of a sick mind.  😷

It wasn’t until I retired that I found out what was holding up all the paperwork, reports, coffee cup, water bottle, phone…..just remembered why I like being retired.  

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