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Garuda Linux


Eric
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2 minutes ago, Eric said:

It's hard to believe that one man could bare so much responsibility for noth the Mustang and the K-Car.

It was a major shift.  The concept of open source free quality software that could run major equipment....it changed the world.   At the time you had perhaps four major OS developers.  Microsoft and Apple were the biggest back then.   Unless you wanted to get into main frame computing.  Cray ran their own system.  I knew a guy that worked for them for a while and was a lead on their system.

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2 minutes ago, Eric said:

Windows will find a way to **** up Linux. That would like asking Harley to build an engine that doesn't leak oil. I bet there are puddles under their prototype electric bikes.

It wouldn't be a Harley without oil issues.   Some women use that in place of perfume.  It appeals to a certain type of guy.

How the heck are they going to get the Harley sound out of an electric bike? 

Windows I think is on the decline in some ways.  It might take another 50 years but I think Linux will eventually destroy it.  If for no other reason than 1) Microsoft is moving to everything-as-a-service and the cost will be monumental and 2) the licensing. 

What do you mean I have to lease my desktop?  My files?  That's what 365 is.   There are good things about it and things that are down right terrifying. 

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Just now, holyjohnson said:

you know you can Select Klingon for your Google Language of choice now.

 

 

 

At one time i had the official Klingon to English dictionary.

I could tell you, your ship was a garbage scow. 

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5 minutes ago, Historian said:

It wouldn't be a Harley without oil issues.   Some women use that in place of perfume.  It appeals to a certain type of guy.

How the heck are they going to get the Harley sound out of an electric bike? 

Windows I think is on the decline in some ways.  It might take another 50 years but I think Linux will eventually destroy it.  If for no other reason than 1) Microsoft is moving to everything-as-a-service and the cost will be monumental and 2) the licensing. 

What do you mean I have to lease my desktop?  My files?  That's what 365 is.   There are good things about it and things that are down right terrifying. 

Bill Gates turned his back on the Open Source community in the seventies and he has been trying to fleece everyone with a computer ever since. Microsoft initially planned to charge people for Internet Explorer. Then comes Netscape building a free browser. MS fought like hell to stop them, in courts of law and in the court of public opinion, but they lost. If they hadn't, the Internet would be a pale shadow of what it has become and it would have MS's name on everything. That was an important fight.

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1 minute ago, Eric said:

Bill Gates turned his back on the Open Source community in the seventies and he has been trying to fleece everyone with a computer ever since. Microsoft initially planned to charge people for Internet Explorer. Then comes Netscape building a free browser. MS fought like hell to stop them, in courts of law and in the court of public opinion, but they lost. If they hadn't, the Internet would be a pale shadow of what it has become and it would have MS's name on everything. That was an important fight.

I remember those days.  Nut Scrape was luck to have survived it.  Microsoft is a killer in court.  I think that was part of that revolution that opened the world.

We're just lucky some of the early protocols were not owned by a company.  I mean if concepts like IP, ARP tables and the like...still around today...were considered something you'd pay for?  Networking wouldn't exist as it does today.

Ping...there's one i use daily. 

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7 minutes ago, Historian said:

Sent from a virtual Garuda machine.

image.png.f9a7b8c60ef3889f8583d080a823f9b7.png

The Fire Dragon browser is doing this to the site. Everything that should be white is being treated as transparent, as well as some other style changes. I'll have to look into why it's happening.

 

2139695728_ScreenShot2021-09-06at10_32_49PM.thumb.png.0dad67ed93286007bac9e21ce8ef7422.png

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1 hour ago, Eric said:

The only quirk I have found so far is with the pacakge management system, called Pacman. If you try to install a package and that package requires a dependency be installed AND any of the files in that dependency are already on the system, the installer will not overwrite that file (By default) and the install will fail. It is then necessary to discover where the conflict is and handle the install from the command line, using special options. This will seldom even be an issue, but it is an irritating one to encounter. Debian's APT package system never runs into problems like this. I can count on one hand the number of times that I ever had any kind of problem with the APT system.

Oh well, this is a minor issue, but APT has spoiled me, I guess. Everything else has been great though.

If you are installing the OS on a virtual machine, give it plenty of processing power and memory. They are serious about the required minimum resources.

I read about this not to long ago but haven't spun it up to test it.  It looks stunning, no doubt.  To be honest, an immediate thing I saw that I knew I wouldn't like, is that it used Pacman.  I know Arch Linux has a rather maniacal following, but I can't get past that terrible package manager.  If I wanted to work that hard to install software, I'd just compile it from source.  Apt and Yum are far superior, and even my limited experience with dnf, says it is way better (I think it's more or less an update of Yum, so that isn't surprising).

I've used Linux on my home machines for about 14-15yrs.  Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, Mint, PCLinuxOS... I've used them all and all their associated desktop GUI's... but I always came back to Debian and XFCE... so now I just don't fight it anyomre.  It's not pretty like these new GUI's, but completely functional... which I appreciate.  I'll likely never leave.. but I spin up new distros to test all the time, and I'll definitely test this one when I have time.

My personal file server/NAS.. I built and it's running OpenMediaVault (basically Debian with a fairly intuitive web management tool).  Simple to setup, and being Debian.. just dead nuts stable.  While I'm sure it's nothing compared to what you're doing... I'm running about 15 dockers for various services.  I've used it about 10yrs and really like it.  If it ever went away or stopped development (which is a possibility as it's a 1-2 man show).. I'd probably just go with straight Debian server install and set everything up there (which wouldn't be difficult)

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25 minutes ago, IndyGunFreak said:

I read about this not to long ago but haven't spun it up to test it.  It looks stunning, no doubt.  To be honest, an immediate thing I saw that I knew I wouldn't like, is that it used Pacman.  I know Arch Linux has a rather maniacal following, but I can't get past that terrible package manager.  If I wanted to work that hard to install software, I'd just compile it from source.  Apt and Yum are far superior, and even my limited experience with dnf, says it is way better (I think it's more or less an update of Yum, so that isn't surprising).

I've used Linux on my home machines for about 14-15yrs.  Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, Mint, PCLinuxOS... I've used them all and all their associated desktop GUI's... but I always came back to Debian and XFCE... so now I just don't fight it anyomre.  It's not pretty like these new GUI's, but completely functional... which I appreciate.  I'll likely never leave.. but I spin up new distros to test all the time, and I'll definitely test this one when I have time.

My personal file server/NAS.. I built and it's running OpenMediaVault (basically Debian with a fairly intuitive web management tool).  Simple to setup, and being Debian.. just dead nuts stable.  While I'm sure it's nothing compared to what you're doing... I'm running about 15 dockers for various services.  I've used it about 10yrs and really like it.  If it ever went away or stopped development (which is a possibility as it's a 1-2 man show).. I'd probably just go with straight Debian server install and set everything up there (which wouldn't be difficult)

I have really been enjoying the Cinnamon desktop packaged with Linux Mint. I too do prefer the APT system. Anyway, I think I can live with Pacman though. At least it isn't RPM. :supergrin:

The package system aside, Garuda is an impressive distro. You should give it a test drive.

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52 minutes ago, Historian said:

Sent from a virtual Garuda machine.

image.png.f9a7b8c60ef3889f8583d080a823f9b7.png

It's funny. The Garuda website has a prominent warning against running their OS in a virtual environment, but it has worked flawlessly for me running in Parallels.

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6 hours ago, Eric said:

It's funny. The Garuda website has a prominent warning against running their OS in a virtual environment, but it has worked flawlessly for me running in Parallels.

Vmware Desktop version 16 and it's running just fine.  I like the system.  It's one of the best user interfaces I've ever seen for Linux.  I found it useable within minutes.

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9 hours ago, Eric said:

The Fire Dragon browser is doing this to the site. Everything that should be white is being treated as transparent, as well as some other style changes. I'll have to look into why it's happening.

FYI, it's almost every site i see with a lot of white.

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2 minutes ago, railfancwb said:

Best I recall every other Windows version release was crap. The ones which were not crap were generally very good. 

Ehh....define good.  There were some that were far better than others and some that sucked less.

10 set a standard.  Combine it with an SSD and you have something.

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13 minutes ago, Historian said:

This is simply the best Linux distro I've ever used.  

 

Yeah, I am enjoying it too. I am writing and testing a spidering program in it right now. I love that I can use Atom in that OS.

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Just now, Eric said:

Yeah, I am enjoying it too. I am writing and testing a spidering program in it right now. I love that I can use Atom in that OS.

I have found a load of fine tools for network and security management that work flawless.  I can even get "company" email on this thing easily.

I'm ready to ditch 10 on a decent system and put this thing on it.

Very solid well produced system.

 

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Who remembers installing DOS 5 or Windows 3.0 on a computer? You sat there with a whole stack of floppies, feeding them obediently into the drive, when prompted. Then disk 5 or 8 or 10 would **** the bed inexplicably and you would have to start over.

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1 minute ago, Historian said:

I have found a load of fine tools for network and security management that work flawless.  I can even get "company" email on this thing easily.

I'm ready to ditch 10 on a decent system and put this thing on it.

Very solid well produced system.

 

Yeah, I am impressed. This isn't just the same old thing in a pretty, new wrapper.

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From a post awhile back “…the sound of a Harley on an electric cycle…”

A hobby of mine is the 7+ inch gauge outdoor railroads. (7-1/2 in much of the country 7-1/4 elsewhere) The locomotives were once almost entirely “live steam”. Now diesel outline locomotives dominate; some with lawnmower size IC engines, others with battery power. Many now have sound systems. The electric Harley could also.

The ultimate would be an electric Harley with a mind blowing sound system and a “Loud Pipes Save Lives” bumper sticker. 

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22 minutes ago, railfancwb said:

From a post awhile back “…the sound of a Harley on an electric cycle…”

A hobby of mine is the 7+ inch gauge outdoor railroads. (7-1/2 in much of the country 7-1/4 elsewhere) The locomotives were once almost entirely “live steam”. Now diesel outline locomotives dominate; some with lawnmower size IC engines, others with battery power. Many now have sound systems. The electric Harley could also.

The ultimate would be an electric Harley with a mind blowing sound system and a “Loud Pipes Save Lives” bumper sticker. 

That 'loud pipes saves lives' bit is a bunch of horseshit. They do it because they think it sounds cool. If they were worried about safety, they wouldn't strip off most of the lighting, they would wear brighter colors and maybe some decent safety gear. There is nothing wrong with liking loud exhaust. I'm  a fan myself. The Ti-Force exhaust I put on my ZX-14s would set off car alarms and every dog in a one-mile radius, when it got above 5,000rpm. There is no need to try to wrap justification around it though.

When I road, I wore a SNELL and DOT-approved full-face helmet, a good jacket, jeans and motorcycle boots. I almost never see a harley rider with a full-face helmet, or a regular helmet, or sleeves.

Now that I've got that out of my system, if Harley doesn't put some sort of noise generator on its electric bikes, you can bet your ass that some enterprising soul is working on one right now.

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Well I damn near had to pull an all-nighter to do it, but I wrote and tested my first spidering program on Garuda. My skills are damned rusty and it took frequent trips to the search engine to get my ducks lined back up, you know how they can scatter, but I got back up to speed. It was great working on Garuda. The only two issues I ran into was using my MacOS handswipes absently, to jump between apps and instead jumping out of Garuda's virtual environment. The other issue was that with Garuda, I can now use my favorite text editor, Atom. I am so conditioned from using Nano on Linux systems though, that I kept hitting 'CTRL-X - Y' to save changes. Atom did not like this and he punished me for it.

I actually couldn't write this program on my MacOS tonight, at least not without a lot of bug hunting. I needed to use the DateTime Perl module, to convert traditional Human-readable date-times back to Epoch time. There are other ways to do it, but using DateTime is the easiest to set up, for me at least. Well, DateTime was not installed on my MacOS and the damned thing wouldn't work properly when I installed it. I am running a local webserver app called MAMP Pro that I think was interfering. Anyway, it took just a few minutes to set the module up on Garuda and I was in business. I really like that OS.

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