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Garuda Linux


Eric
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I've used a lot of different flavors of the Linux operating system, over the years. I started out with RedHat and then SuSE, but dropped them both pretty quickly. GT was actually running on a RedHat server for about three days. Then I discovered Debian Linux and I ran my production servers on that Distro for a couple of decades. I am a big fan of Ubuntu, which is based on Debian and I host my production server on it now. I have another personal computer that is based on an offshoot of Ubuntu, called Linux Mint. I;'m a big fan of that distro.

Today I loaded a new Linux distro into a virtual machine on my MacBook Pro. This new distro is called Garuda Linux and it is by far the nicest Linux distro I have ever seen. Aesthetically, it is amazing. They have done a beautiful job on this OS visually. It uses a fair bit of resources because of these visual effects, but it's worth it. The desktop has an app dock very much like MacOS on the bottom of the desktop and an icon that opens into a nested app list very much like Windows, at the top left. It is unusual to see a distro with both, but I love it.

Everything about this distro is built for performance. It is using a Zen kernel and uses the BTRFS file system. This file system is damned difficult to corrupt and it can take snapshot backups in seconds. This software has tons of features and apps that can be loaded to turn it into a serious gaming platform. It is probably the best version of Linux out there for gaming. It is equally capable of being set up for programming and web development, graphics and audio/video editing or for 2d or 3d CAD design work.

Here is a look at the desktop with and without the nested app menu open.

2080952493_ScreenShot2021-09-06at6_00_53PM.thumb.png.b2f301546f485d8e5e030702030a57ad.png

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Here is a pic with a terminal window open. Notice how the background blurs and the terminal window is partially transparent? There are a lot of effects like this.

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If you are looking for a Linux distro to play around with, this would be a great one to take for a test drive. You can run it on your computer without installing it and if you do install it, the install app is simple and fast.

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16 minutes ago, Historian said:

Downloading it now.

Looks very interesting.

The only quirk I have found so far is with the pacakge management system, called Pacman. If you try to install a package and that package requires a dependency be installed AND any of the files in that dependency are already on the system, the installer will not overwrite that file (By default) and the install will fail. It is then necessary to discover where the conflict is and handle the install from the command line, using special options. This will seldom even be an issue, but it is an irritating one to encounter. Debian's APT package system never runs into problems like this. I can count on one hand the number of times that I ever had any kind of problem with the APT system.

Oh well, this is a minor issue, but APT has spoiled me, I guess. Everything else has been great though.

If you are installing the OS on a virtual machine, give it plenty of processing power and memory. They are serious about the required minimum resources.

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1 minute ago, Eric said:

 

If you are installing the OS on a virtual machine, give it plenty of processing power and memory. They are serious about the required minimum resources.

Like you I've been looking for that perfect distro of Linux desktop.  Some are better than others.  I ran Suse many years ago when it was purchased by Novell.  That had to be about 15 years ago.

Anyway.  Power and RAM are not an issue  on this machine.  This is a Xeon processor machine with 64 gigs of ram.  4 cores and 8 logical processors.

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14 minutes ago, Historian said:

Like you I've been looking for that perfect distro of Linux desktop.  Some are better than others.  I ran Suse many years ago when it was purchased by Novell.  That had to be about 15 years ago.

Anyway.  Power and RAM are not an issue  on this machine.  This is a Xeon processor machine with 64 gigs of ram.  4 cores and 8 logical processors.

I really dislike RedHat and SuSE. I've used nothing but Debian and Debian-based distros for a couple of decades. From what I've been reading, there are several advantages to the Arch Linux/Garuda Linux package system though. I'll just have to learn my way around it. It does have a far greater variety of software, to be sure.

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1 minute ago, Eric said:

I really dislike RedHat and SuSE. I've used nothing but Debian and Debian-based distros for a couple of decades. From what I've been reading, there are several advantages to the Arch Linux/Garuda Linux package system though. I'll just have to learn my way around it. It does have a far greater variety of software, to be sure.

Interesting.  My experience is almost entirely in RedHat and ESXI environments.  I have used Debian and fine it's solid...you mention Unbuntu a while ago...I ran that for a while...and it's a nice system.

 

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1 minute ago, Historian said:

Interesting.  My experience is almost entirely in RedHat and ESXI environments.  I have used Debian and fine it's solid...you mention Unbuntu a while ago...I ran that for a while...and it's a nice system.

 

The Debian-based servers I used to run GT on were beasts. I did a barebones Debian install and rebuilt the kernels myself. Everything that wasn't absolutely necessary was stripped out of them and everything left was hardened. Those systems were tough SOBs that made the absolute most of the resources at their disposal. Hell, I built most of those servers myself as well, so from nuts and bolts of hardware to the finished OS and custom kernel, I did everything. It's a good feeling to be able to do stuff like that.

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The best server I ever had running GT (It was a backend box) costs many, many thousands of dollars. It was state of the art back then. It had a small electrical glitch though. Sometimes when it was powered down and unplugged, when it was plugged back in and the power button was pushed, it wouldn't actually start until you gave it a smack on the side, like an old Curtis-Mathis TV. :supergrin: How's that for high-tech?

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2 minutes ago, Eric said:

The Debian-based servers I used to run GT on were beasts. I did a barebones Debian install and rebuilt the kernels myself. Everything that wasn't absolutely necessary was stripped out of them and everything left was hardened. Those systems were tough SOBs that made the absolute most of the resources at their disposal. Hell, I built most of those servers myself as well, so from nuts and bolts of hardware to the finished OS and custom kernel, I did everything. It's a good feeling to be able to do stuff like that.

Eric, you're gonna' drive me to drinkin'
If you don't stop drivin' that Hot... Rod... Lincoln!

A long time ago you had a problemed user and i asked your privately how you managed to solve the issue.   It was an interesting and highly technical reply.  At that point i knew it was a Linux based system.   I had no idea how bullet proof you made that system or that you built the machine itself.

You have done a lot of interesting things in life, Eric. 

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2 minutes ago, Eric said:

The best server I ever had running GT (It was a backend box) costs many, many thousands of dollars. It was state of the art back then. It had a small electrical glitch though. Sometimes when it was powered down and unplugged, when it was plugged back in and the power button was pushed, it wouldn't actually start until you gave it a smack on the side, like an old Curtis-Mathis TV. :supergrin: How's that for high-tech?

Like the old joke.  You don't pay Eric because he has a hammer.  You pay Eric because he knows where to use the hammer.  

Smack!  Back in the 1980s IBM would actually ask you to pick up the PC and drop it about a foot...to make sure any cards were fully seated.  

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6 minutes ago, Eric said:

The best server I ever had running GT (It was a backend box) costs many, many thousands of dollars. It was state of the art back then. It had a small electrical glitch though. Sometimes when it was powered down and unplugged, when it was plugged back in and the power button was pushed, it wouldn't actually start until you gave it a smack on the side, like an old Curtis-Mathis TV. :supergrin: How's that for high-tech?

Given he number of users you had on the old systems they made to be beasts.   I wondered at some point if you had a clustered system.

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5 minutes ago, Historian said:

Eric, you're gonna' drive me to drinkin'
If you don't stop drivin' that Hot... Rod... Lincoln!

A long time ago you had a problemed user and i asked your privately how you managed to solve the issue.   It was an interesting and highly technical reply.  At that point i knew it was a Linux based system.   I had no idea how bullet proof you made that system or that you built the machine itself.

You have done a lot of interesting things in life, Eric. 

I don't like having to be dependent on other people for stuff like that. Even if I pay someone to do the work, I want to know how to do it myself. It is a quirk of mine.

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26 minutes ago, Historian said:

Seven is a solid desktop.

Yep, I do not recall having to call the wife at work and asking her to talk me down from taking a 12 gauge to the last win 7 equipped machine we had. 8.1 on the other hand...

Btw, every other comment here may as well be in Japanese to me. 

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1 minute ago, Historian said:

Given he number of users you had on the old systems they made to be beasts.   I wondered at some point if you had a clustered system.

I wasn't running a cluster, but at it's high point, I was running a master & slave DB servers and eight load-balancing frontend servers. It could have been done with fewer servers, but it would have been substantially more expensive to buy servers powerful enough to run the site with fewer servers. Having more good, but not bleeding-edge servers netted me at least as much performance and better fault-tolerance, for a lot less money.

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3 minutes ago, jfost11 said:

Yep, I do not recall having to call the wife at work and asking her to talk me down from taking a 12 gauge to the last win 7 equipped machine we had. 8.1 on the other hand...

Btw, every other comment here may as well be in Japanese to me. 

The laptop I am on right now is a MacBook Pro, running MacOS. In addition to that operating system I am currently running two versions of Linux and an instance of Windows Ten simultaneously, each in their own virtual container. Each one thinks it is an autonomous computer  system. I love technology. :supergrin:

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4 minutes ago, Eric said:

I wasn't running a cluster, but at it's high point, I was running a master & slave DB servers and eight load-balancing frontend servers. It could have been done with fewer servers, but it would have been substantially more expensive to buy servers powerful enough to run the site with fewer servers. Having more good, but not bleeding-edge servers netted me at least as much performance and better fault-tolerance, for a lot less money.

That's a heck of a lot of hardware, Eric.  Were you using a physical load balancer?  Like a Kemp?  I've had excellent results with them in an Exchange environment.  No virtualization?

That is a massive amount of processing ability.  I had no idea GT was that gigantic.  We all knew it was big but you weren't running a server in your down stairs bathroom. 

What the heck was your bandwidth?

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7 minutes ago, jfost11 said:

Yep, I do not recall having to call the wife at work and asking her to talk me down from taking a 12 gauge to the last win 7 equipped machine we had. 8.1 on the other hand...

Btw, every other comment here may as well be in Japanese to me. 

8.1 was bad.   Really bad.   Ever wonder why there wasn't a 9?  Because Microsoft had this odd issue of every other numbered operating system sucked blue oysters.  

They skipped 9 and went to 10...to get past that image in users minds.

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Just now, Historian said:

That's a heck of a lot of hardware, Eric.  Were you using a physical load balancer?  Like a Kemp?  I've had excellent results with them in an Exchange environment.  No virtualization?

That is a massive amount of processing ability.  I had no idea GT was that gigantic.  We all knew it was big but you weren't running a server in your down stairs bathroom. 

What the heck was your bandwidth?

There was a company that used to make some fairly badass dedicated load balancing appliances. I forget their name. The boxes were purple. They were about the same color that Juniper network equipment is today. It might be the same company. Anyway, those boxes were pretty amazing. You could have up to three failover devices strung together, if I remember correctly. I just ran one primary and one failover. They were pricey.

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2 minutes ago, Eric said:

There was a company that used to make some fairly badass dedicated load balancing appliances. I forget their name. The boxes were purple. They were about the same color that Juniper network equipment is today. It might be the same company. Anyway, those boxes were pretty amazing. You could have up to three failover devices strung together, if I remember correctly. I just ran one primary and one failover. They were pricey.

Wow.  That explains why the system rarely went down.    That box might have been Elfiq?  I seem to remember them.

Eric that's not a hobby that's a business. When you sold it i hope you made obscene money.

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