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Walt Longmire

You wanna be a Timber Faller? Here's your saw.

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I do a lot of my firewood cutting with a Stihl MS460 Magnum running a 28" bar. Has the wrap handle and big dawgs along with a dual port muffler. I sold the Husqvarna 576 in my profile pic. It was the same class saw as my 460. If I'm cutting smaller stuff, I will grab one of my smaller saws cause I'm old and puny. I picked up a Husqvarna 365 Special a while back and treated it to a handle bar, dawg upgrade. I have run it a little, but not used it yet for going after a load of firewood. It's sitting next in the lineup and will be going out for a workout soon. The 365 is 65 cc's vs. the 76 cc's of the 576 and the MS460. A little lighter than either of those.

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And in my experience, I've never heard a timber faller yell, "Timber." When your working the back cut and about to drop that mother, you shut the saw off and listen for your partner. Make yourself aware of his whereabouts. If his saw is running he won't hear you yell, but you do it anyway just in case someone else has come onto the job site. Hit the wedges, fire the saw back up, and give the back cut a little more sawing. Then you yell, "WOOD." The back cut starts to open up a little. You're looking up watching the top move. Watching for widow makers. You pull the saw from the cut and haul ass out your pre planned exit. The holding wood groans. She's going over right into the lay. There is a huge crash. The ground trembles. Limbs and **** going everywhere. When the dust settles you climb up on the butt and shove the bent horse shoe nail on the end of your Spencer tape in and start measuring off as you walk the log to where you'll make your first cut. It's no longer a tree. It's a log. We lived for this.

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I had an old McCulloch landscape saw. BIG motor. Short blade. Made for cutting railroad ties and logs for landscaping. We used it for cutting pallets for firewood as well as cutting trees. A real beast in its day. 
 

When it died I replaced it with a much smaller Stihl Farm Boss. The Stihl actually out preformed the old one because the chain speed was so much faster. 

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I've got an axe and some ratchet loopers at the moment. But it's looking like I will need a new chainsaw in the spring. My 20 year old Poulan crapper took it's last crap two years ago.

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1 hour ago, Walt Longmire said:

A razor sharp chainsaw is much less dangerous to operate than a dull one. You'll be forcing the dull one. 

This is true for most if not all cutting tools. 

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I worked in several cedar mills in my youth. Got to work around an electric chain saw in the shake mill at Aloha. It was a beast used to buck the cedar logs into blocks to be ran through hydraulic splitters and then off the the huge band saws the sawyers used to turn them into shakes. I ran the splitters too. Prime splitter turned the blocks into manageable pieces. Then the re-splitters turned them into boards that were sent to the sawyers. The splitters cared not what they split. Lots of guys I knew were missing hands and fingers. The prime splitters got hands. Re-splitters could take hands or fingers. The band saws the sawyers ran took fingers. I stayed away from the band saws. Did every other job in the mill. I also worked in the shingle mill at the same facility. Started doing cleanup there when I was still in high school. Lied about my age to get hired when I was 17. I ended up doing nearly every job there from working on the log pond as a Pond Rat, working on deck with huge circular saws that turned the logs to blocks. When the logs were too big for the circular saw, we got out the McCulloch 125. On the deck with roller chains moving the blocks was a pantograph splitter that could be moved over the blocks to split them into proper size for the shingle saws. The blocks went up a conveyor to where guys stacked them on rollers that fed to the sawyers. Two circular saws, one with a reciprocating carriage that moved the block back and forth into the saw slicing off the shingles, and another saw 90 degrees to it in front of the sawyer where he trimmed both sides of the shingles several in a stack at a time. You had to make various sizes of shingles (to make fits for the packer) so during trimming one hand went to the far side of the spinning blade as you lopped off the needed sizes. The saws making the shingles were about 3 feet in diameter. In both mills I saw guys get cut. I ran shingle saws part time, but never did it as part of my job. On night shift there were idle saws, and I would saw as I got time and then at the end of the shift go below to the packing bins and make the shingles into bundles. I'd mark my bundles with the number for one of the sawing/packing teams to help up their count as pay was partially dependent on production. I'd get a bonus from that team. There was always reasons to be moved around if you were willing to do other jobs. I was. Someone might quit, get hired on somewhere else, or go on a bender. I ran fork lifts. Did pretty much anything I was asked to do, and some stuff I wasn't asked to do. LOL. It was a neat place to work, around some very interesting men. I got in a couple fights during my time there, likely due to my youth and guys thinking  they could put me in my place and look good to their buddies. Didn't work. I kicked their asses. Boxed all the way through school and wrestled too, plus growing up in a logging family. After I thrashed the second guy I was never messed with again. Good times. I think looking back, the pond job was my favorite. The pond shack at the bottom of the log slip that was a break room, warming shack, and place for supplies, was wall papered with center fold outs from Playboy and Penthouse. 

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21 hours ago, Swampfox762 said:

Just DAMN!!!!  What does somethin like that cost?

It is paid for in the liberal tears.

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