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railfancwb

Gone and [almost] forgotten...

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36 minutes ago, gwalchmai said:

I never understood getting rid of Oldsmobile and Pontiac and keeping Buick. :sad:

Old people still buy cars. 

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Wicked Pete's Ale

Sent from my Jack boot using Copatalk

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2 hours ago, gwalchmai said:

I never understood getting rid of Oldsmobile and Pontiac and keeping Buick. :sad:

I heard that Buick was/is THE brand in China. 

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I think Western Auto was owned by Sears for awhile. At least I saw Diehard Batteries and Craftsman tools in one near where I lived. 

Edited by railfancwb
Correct typo
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RCA still around by not many people remember when Radio Corp. of America had a building shaped like a vacuum tube.

HeathKit....now there was some fun.  Build your own TV or radio.

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2 minutes ago, Historian said:

RCA still around by not many people remember when Radio Corp. of America had a building shaped like a vacuum tube.

HeathKit....now there was some fun.  Build your own TV or radio.

My brother built a number of HeathKit TVs. One for his family and one each for parents/in-laws. 

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4 minutes ago, railfancwb said:

My brother built a number of HeathKit TVs. One for his family and one each for parents/in-laws. 

You could learn a lot from them.  They are still around but are not producing the way they once were.  But they were the kit in the day.

Collins and Drake radios.

 

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3 hours ago, Historian said:

That one hurt.  I remember when you could go there and say i need three zenier diods, one Varactor diode, and a capacitor...and they would point at the way and say right there.

They went from Radio Shack to The Shack.

What Radio Shack had become at the point they closed was a pale shadow of what they had once been. Long gone was the day that you could walk in there and buy whatever electronic bit you needed and actually have someone knowledgeable behind the counter. 

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2 hours ago, Fnfalman said:

Old people still buy cars. 

Old people spend their savings.  They are already old.  So they represent money.

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12 minutes ago, railfancwb said:

My brother built a number of HeathKit TVs. One for his family and one each for parents/in-laws. 

Under the GI Bill, many in our Research Lab built console color TV's from Heathkit.  No matter what your professional status, you said you wanted to be a TV repair Technician.

 

I had one too.

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Curtis-Mathis. That was the brand of our first color TV. It was a 27” model in a giant wooden console. That was one heavy mother. 

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In the late eighties, someone tried to make a go of a fast food chain in San Antonio, TX, called Rapid Rabbit. Yep, fast food rabbit. They opened three locations and six months later, they closed 3 location. The world wasn’t ready for fast food rabbit, even deep in the heart of Texas. 

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Our first TV was a 10 inch Sylvania.  We were 60 miles from the TV stations but had a 4 story roof with a sheet Copper top to the roof.  My father had a 20 foot mast on top of that with a large antenna array on top.

We picked up the 4 operating TV stations in the state.  We had one of the first TV's in town.

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9 hours ago, Eric said:

What Radio Shack had become at the point they closed was a pale shadow of what they had once been. Long gone was the day that you could walk in there and buy whatever electronic bit you needed and actually have someone knowledgeable behind the counter. 

Those were good days.  They gave way to a consumer market.  Cell phones were not their thing.  

 

Edited by Historian
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14 minutes ago, Eric said:

In the late eighties, someone tried to make a go of a fast food chain in San Antonio, TX, called Rapid Rabbit. Yep, fast food rabbit. They opened three locations and six months later, they closed 3 location. The world wasn’t ready for fast food rabbit, even deep in the heart of Texas. 

Probably still isn’t. 

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22 minutes ago, Historian said:

Those were good days.  The gave way to a consumer market.  Cell phones were not their thing.  

 

Neither was all the other electronic garbage that came to choke their shelves. A company should never forget who brought them to the dance. 

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43 minutes ago, janice6 said:

Old people spend their savings.  They are already old.  So they represent money.

Yet all the print and especially TV advertisers want the young ones... under 35, maybe under 30...

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6 minutes ago, railfancwb said:

Yet all the print and especially TV advertisers want the young ones... under 35, maybe under 30...

Isn't it funny when they want your disposable income, and they ignore the very people whose total income is disposable.  After all, you are already old, you're not saving for a damned thing!

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We got a Zenith tv as a wedding present.  It moved around the country with us for probably 20 years.

Not really sure what happened to it,  but I'll bet it was still working, wherever we left it.

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When our daughter was very little,  I heard her in the other room, going "OOOOOO!!!  RAINBOWS!!!"  Whatever.

When I finally went into the room,  she had a huge horseshoe magnet and was rubbing it all over the tv screen and making "rainbows".

The colors were never really right after that.

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8 hours ago, Fnfalman said:

Old people still buy cars. 

About a decade ago, GM marketing showed that the average Buick customer was around 70 years of age. Old people have some money and may buy autos, but they are a demographic that cannot be counted on for additional purchases. The large land yacht is dead, the executive auto is effectively on its last legs [when was the last time you saw a new Mercedes E or S-Klasse, a BMW 5 or 7 series on the road, a Lexus LS, an Infiniti Q class, etc.]. North Americans want bloated cars that resemble SUVs. 

Buick had a dealership network in China dating back to the 1920s and it was the luxury ride in the eyes of many Chinese people. That is diminishing, but the 60+ year olds love them because they represent wealth and luxury.   

I have a newer F-350 and I can see getting rid of it in a year or three. It is too much truck for my diminishing physical capacities and I am considering my last vehicle. No one out there makes anything that I can afford, easily get into or out of, and that has room and V-8 ICE power. 

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