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Al Czervik

Snowbird crash

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i`m not a pilot but.

 

i imagine the Pilot trying to get control right to the end to keep it out of a Neighborhood and the Co-Pilot only ejecting after being Ordered to.

maybe that's just the way i want to see it playing out.

 

God Bless Her.

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Posted (edited)

Like many of the facilities I work at,  that are incomprehensibly complex,  I quit wondering why they break down all the time, but wonder how they even work at all.

How many, finely fitted and tuned, parts does a fighter jet have?

(I've seen parts of the inside of the space shuttle. It's a miracle it ever worked even once.)

(The Apollo spacecraft, by comparison,  were welded wheelbarrows and oil drums,  sitting on top of a loosely contained bomb.)

Edited by Huaco Kid
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He breaks off the formation very soon after takeoff. Sure looks like an engine problem and it is only a single engine jet - worst possible time to have an engine problem.

I didn't see any chutes open after the ejections.  

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3 hours ago, Walt Longmire said:

Looks like the ejection shot them right into the ground.

Mmmqb opinion is that an engine out or compressor stall initiated PIC to yank the stick to gain altitude.  The PIC either spent too much time trying to initiate an air start, or just did not pay attention to the indicated airspeed, which lead to the stall.  IIRC, the hot seats in the Tutor are something like 60/60 level seats.  Meaning minimum survival is level 60KIAS at 60 feet AGL.  At the time of handle yankage, the window of survivability had lapsed.  However, one did survive.

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7 minutes ago, Al Czervik said:

Mmmqb opinion is that an engine out or compressor stall initiated PIC to yank the stick to gain altitude.  The PIC either spent too much time trying to initiate an air start, or just did not pay attention to the indicated airspeed, which lead to the stall.  IIRC, the hot seats in the Tutor are something like 60/60 level seats.  Meaning minimum survival is level 60KIAS at 60 feet AGL.  At the time of handle yankage, the window of survivability had lapsed.  However, one did survive.

Thanks for the info.

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Does anybody know who goes out first in the side by side configuration. I find it interesting that they both went out within a second of each other and one survived and one didn't.

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7 hours ago, willie-pete said:

Does anybody know who goes out first in the side by side configuration. I find it interesting that they both went out within a second of each other and one survived and one didn't.

My understanding is that in those old systems, if you want to save your life, you need to pull the handle.  Otherwise, you will reunite with Earth in the aircraft, or with/as parts of the aircraft.  At the point they were at, inches matter.

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