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People starting to get fed up with being cooped up

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1 minute ago, Walt Longmire said:

I imagine the fines were hefty. Not that I would know anything about that, growing up in the era of fast cars.

We had a long understanding and interest in our paths in life.  He was a criminal and we were criminal asset relocation specialists.

The judge...knew what was going on.  It was a small county.  He did laugh over it. 

He was shown mercy by the court.  Only got one speeding ticket (mine), and a couple of fix it tickets (tail light out) that once fixed turned into $5 processing fees.  He was out for probably a couple hundred if i remember.  

Drove real nice after that.

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As kids,  we knew every trail within several counties better than the deer.

On the roads,  we were never more than 1/4 or 1/2 mile away from an exit-trail.

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18 minutes ago, Historian said:

We had a long understanding and interest in our paths in life.  He was a criminal and we were criminal asset relocation specialists.

The judge...knew what was going on.  It was a small county.  He did laugh over it. 

He was shown mercy by the court.  Only got one speeding ticket (mine), and a couple of fix it tickets (tail light out) that once fixed turned into $5 processing fees.  He was out for probably a couple hundred if i remember.  

Drove real nice after that.

I finally grew out of some of my shenanigans. Lucky I didn't cause, or be part of a tragedy. I could tell stories, but I probably shouldn't.

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2 hours ago, Historian said:

Drove real nice after that.

The only time I ever got popped in the back of the head with handcuff-knuckles (more than once) was getting pulled over for (?)40 in a 25,  through our small town in Texas my parents moved me to.

A long-haired yankee punk.

(The whole "town" was 1/4 mile long.  The highschool graduating class was 13.)

I went below the limit,  from then on.

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He was just "nipping it in the bud".

I don't remember if I even got a ticket.

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2 hours ago, Huaco Kid said:

I went below the limit,  from then on.

There's a song about that.

Hank Williams...

 

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3 hours ago, Huaco Kid said:

The only time I ever got popped in the back of the head with handcuff-knuckles (more than once) was getting pulled over for (?)40 in a 25,  through our small town in Texas my parents moved me to.

A long-haired yankee punk.

(The whole "town" was 1/4 mile long.  The highschool graduating class was 13.)

I went below the limit,  from then on.

Our class was 38.

 

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"The overall burden of influenza for the 2014-2015 season... 51,000 flu-associated deaths "

US deaths by coronavirus in the past 2 months or so = 54,161.

12 months vs 2 months.   I wonder how high the total would be at this point without the shutdowns and social distancing, etc. 50% more? Double? Triple? We may get a good idea about that with a few states removing restrictions.

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The biggest problem with the C19 death rate is that the CDC gave cart blanc to anyone wanting to attibute a death to c19. That is seriously f'd up and it destroys good science/medicine. How do you know how many people actually died from the disease if you are told dead people at "thought" to HAVE the disease.  Seriously, they don't even have to test positive to be registered as a C19 death. There are political and monitary reasons to crank up the numbers of deaths. Do you think that people would fudge data to better their grants?

 

NH storm knocks out power to 270,000. - AR15.COM

 

SO, how many ACTUAL deaths FROM C19 are there? How many deaths were from people that were already going to die from comorbidity issues? Without a doubt the numbers of actual deaths from C19 are exaggerated. 

 

Normal kids aren't dying from it (there are always exceptions with underlying conditions) so frankly I am not going to freak out. 

 

 

 

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15 hours ago, Walt Longmire said:

Our class was 38.

 

You're a lot older than i thought. 😁

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22 hours ago, Historian said:

You can not, out run my radio. 😁

I've said this myself.

I've also run smack into the limitations of radios. Like end of a footchase, down an alley, in an apartment, five at gunpoint. Damn, battery fell off back there somewhere. "You all don't move! I'm going to borrow your phone."

Or the canyons, fifteen minute climb to get a signal.

But specific to a chase, there has to be someone on the other end of the radio to join the pursuit. That is the downside to working rural areas, lots of nothing, nobody there, if they break out they are home free. Or, a long way from home, but still free. These situations are balanced by the fact that we usually know who it was and where they live.

Another saying I like. "You can run, but you can't hide."

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1 hour ago, Fog said:

But specific to a chase, there has to be someone on the other end of the radio to join the pursuit. That is the downside to working rural areas, lots of nothing, nobody there, if they break out they are home free. Or, a long way from home, but still free. These situations are balanced by the fact that we usually know who it was and where they live.

 

Nothing beats dispatch saying, "(Call sign) your back is in route. You can expect 30 minutes."

That's when you sorta gotta John Wayne up about things.

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On the other hand my city had a problem that it was cut in half by active railroads.  I often heard the call that backup or assistance is delayed by the train and another will be dispatched from an alternative site.  Meanwhile, you do the best you can by yourself.

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4 hours ago, janice6 said:

On the other hand my city had a problem that it was cut in half by active railroads.  I often heard the call that backup or assistance is delayed by the train and another will be dispatched from an alternative site.  Meanwhile, you do the best you can by yourself.

That can happen in my area too.  And have mercy some of those trains are long...and not stopping.

I once parked my car and stood next to it and watched for 20 minutes as that train went by.  I was starting to wonder if it ever ended.

We have a railroader here on TBS...happen to think he's got a much better job than me. 😁

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23 hours ago, Fog said:

I've said this myself.

I've also run smack into the limitations of radios. Like end of a footchase, down an alley, in an apartment, five at gunpoint. Damn, battery fell off back there somewhere. "You all don't move! I'm going to borrow your phone."

Or the canyons, fifteen minute climb to get a signal.

But specific to a chase, there has to be someone on the other end of the radio to join the pursuit. That is the downside to working rural areas, lots of nothing, nobody there, if they break out they are home free. Or, a long way from home, but still free. These situations are balanced by the fact that we usually know who it was and where they live.

Another saying I like. "You can run, but you can't hide."

That was typical at the beach where I grew up. 50 miles to the sheriff dept. When they did have radio contact there was often not another cruiser around. State Patrol had better radios but also was often not another car around.

The county sheriff office finally invested in 6 new cars to catch some of the runners. Fords with 429 Interceptors in them. State Patrol was running Dodge's with 440's. 

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On 4/26/2020 at 4:46 PM, janice6 said:

On the other hand my city had a problem that it was cut in half by active railroads.  I often heard the call that backup or assistance is delayed by the train and another will be dispatched from an alternative site.  Meanwhile, you do the best you can by yourself.

Of late, a growing number of mainline railroads are adopting “Precision Scheduling” I believe it is called. Translates to fewer but longer trains. Be interesting - from a spectator point of view - to see whether situations such as your are made better or worse by this. 

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8 minutes ago, railfancwb said:

Of late, a growing number of mainline railroads are adopting “Precision Scheduling” I believe it is called. Translates to fewer but longer trains. Be interesting - from a spectator point of view - to see whether situations such as your are made better or worse by this. 

As a result of the adverse effects of long unexpected delays in first responders, my city build a huge raised roadway over the railroad tracks to provide some relief for the responders.

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