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About This Club

This is a club dedicated to the subtle art and exact science of ammunition loading and reloading. We have made this are a club, rather than just a forum, so that the reloading area could have more than one forum, if needed, its own photo gallery, its own Blog area and more. This is an open club and anyone who likes can join.

  1. What's new in this club
  2. I friend in Idaho runs his own Reloading YouTube Channel. He also live-streams a couple times a week. As a matter of facts, he is online right now. I love watching his videos or streams while reloading. He has a lot of equipment and knowledge. His Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLozPRQcgS73LAg7L8bz73Q Current live stream:
  3. It's been a year, I see the discussion was a lively one... (sarcasm) and no, this is not me volunteering. :p
  4. crockett

    lock rings

    That should work and be a noticeable improvement. PSA is a couple bucks cheaper... just found it... https://usa.palmettostatearmory.com/hornady-sure-loctm-lock-ring-6-pack-044606.html
  5. Cougar_ml

    lock rings

    Thanks for the input. I now have half a dozen of the Hornady Sure-Loc rings on order. I figure this should let me take care of a dozen dies as the rings I'm taking off I can double up on other dies and use them to jam the ones already there. I thought about just ordering some regular jam nuts for it, but they cost almost as much as the Hornady ones.
  6. crockett

    lock rings

    I use Hornady lock rings on all my dies but the Dillon dies on the 550 due to the cramped tool head. Got a load of unused Redding rings, which tend to damage the threads after a while. Here a bunch of rings I could find in a hurry: Left to right: 1.) Hornady: best system IMO 2.) Forster: made out of aluminium, thread for lock screw may strip, flimsy 3.) Redding: they use a small metall piece that pushes pressure only to one spot of the thread. Design failure IMO. Never truly releases pressure and scratches the thread of the die when turning. 4.) LEE: That "lock rubber ring" is too stiff and makes it hard to turn by hand at times. It is also not precise because it will move when screwing in the die. It's LEE, you get what you pay for. 5.) Dillon lock ring, without any locking screw. Basically useless, it forces you to dial in your dies every single time. The Hornady rings lock down tight without putting uneven pressure on the die thread. They are made out of proper steel, not aluminium. https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1165236200/hornady-sure-loc-die-locking-ring-7-8-14-thread Hornady offers a nice wrench as well. https://www.midwayusa.com/product/191984/hornady-lock-n-load-deluxe-die-locking-ring-wrench Some of those Hornady rings on my Redding dies...
  7. JHB

    lock rings

    I use RCBS dies and lock rings with no problems. The way I set the dies and rings is like this. Set the die to the height you want it. The locking ring backed off. Hold the die from turning with one hand and spin the ring down with the other. Just barley touch the top of the press with the lock ring. Holding the die in position back the lock ring off about 2 degrees. Snug the set screw. I do this with the ram up and a case in the die. If 2 degrees is to much or not enough adjust accordingly.
  8. So I use an RCBS JR3 press, I have a mix of dies, but mostly RCBS dies that I use. The lock ring that comes with them is kind of a joke to me, I get everything set, tighten down the set screw, go to remove the die and find out the lock rings isn't locked to the die (and yes, I use a wrench on the lock ring to remove the die when tightened down). So my question is what lock rings do you recommend for someone that changes out the dies on a regular basis? I'm thinking one of the split ring types, Hornady, Lyman, and Foster all have them for relatively inexpensive, or is there anything better out there for not much more cost (The 3 brands I listed are around $3-$4 per lock ring)
  9. Cougar_ml

    Brass Tumbler for Newbie

    I sometimes use the Frankford Arsenal depriming hand tool. It does the job, but more than a hundred or so rounds at a time tends to start rubbing my hand, and it can hurt. Less painful if I wear some type of a glove, but it can still take a lot of effort, especially if you're trying to do brass with crimped primers. It's easy enough to sit down and watch tv or a movie while depriming some brass. You should be able to do the same with the Lee Hand Press. As for cleaning the brass, it really depends on how clean you want it. As was said before, soak it for a little while then shake with some steel pins will get most of the softer/looser crud out. Brass doesn't need to be spotlessly clean to function, you just don't want too much carbon building up over time to reduce case capacity and gunk up the primer pocket and flash hole. I've been cleaning brass in an ultrasonic tank for a while because I have one for my job, but finally broke down and ordered Frankford (not Franklin) Arsenal's Wet Tumbler to do a better job with the range brass that's been sitting out for a while.
  10. c10bonanza

    Brass Tumbler for Newbie

    Well, I called an audible and ordered a Lee Hand Press and Universal Decapper. This should accomplish the same purpose of the Franklin Arsenal deprimer, but also allow me to handload some rifle rounds down the road.
  11. When my Lyman tumbler finally gave up the ghost after years of service, I went cheap and bought a tumbler at Harbor Freight. Don't bother. Get a decent one from any of the major reloading equipment companies. And welcome to the world of bullet packing.
  12. crockett

    Brass Tumbler for Newbie

    Yes, I deprime before tumbling. My brass is super clean inside and out. I hate realoading with dirty brass, let alone shooting dirty brass in any of my guns. I tumble my brass for about 90 min. Less time will leave some grime behind. You would need to shake it for a very long time to get anywhere near the same result. That being said, soaking the brass in hot water, dish detergent and lime shine, then shaking it for 3 minutes, should get it somewhat clean. You can try it with any container and see if you like the result. You can also add some liquid car wax for some shine. If you don't have the cash right now, that's what I would. That being said, the time invested is also valuable. My minimum would be the HF tumbler and the 2lb bag of SS pins.
  13. c10bonanza

    Brass Tumbler for Newbie

    Do you deprime before tumbling? Any thoughts on a "poor man" method of shaking for awhile by hand? Really trying to avoid dumping $200 right now.
  14. crockett

    Brass Tumbler for Newbie

    I started with dry tumbling and changed over to wet tumbling with stainless steel media. It is night and day, literally. My brass looks like new. Dry tumbling will leave dirty primer pockets behind, and there will be dirt inside the brass as well. If the Frankfort kit is too much, you can also get a Harbor Freight tumbler for $44: https://www.harborfreight.com/3-lb-rotary-rock-tumbler-67631.html And a stainless steel media kit. This 2lb bag will be plenty. Lime shine from Wally World is only a couple bucks. https://www.stainlesstumblingmedia.com/reloading-products/media/stainless-tumbling-media-refresh.html How my brass locks like: That hand held depriming tool will only give you cramps and is not a good long-term investment. If you would add $40 you could have a really decent press like the Lyman Brass Smith Victory. https://www.cabelas.com/product/LYMAN-BRASS-SMITH-C-FRAME-PRESS/2726079.uts Plus the LEE universal decapping die for $13: https://www.cabelas.com/product/Lee-Decapping-Die/1200579.uts?slotId=3 When you decide to reload, you only need to add a set of dies, a scale and a measure.
  15. c10bonanza

    Brass Tumbler for Newbie

    Now THAT's a tumbler! I've seen where Jerry Miculek uses a concrete mixer to tumble 5 gallon buckets of brass at a time! I'm also considering just doing it by hand. Put 100 pieces of brass or so in a jug with Dawn, lemi-shine, and maybe a handful of stainless steel pins and shake by hand for awhile. It wouldn't cost much to experiment!
  16. willie-pete

    Brass Tumbler for Newbie

    Here is my tumbler and brass. The tumbler you show should be fine. I just use corncob; not walnut. Wet tumblers get the brass shinier; I'm not worried about how shiny it is. It does do a good job on cleaning primer pockets, but so will a wash in hot, soapy water.
  17. I don't reload my ammo (yet), but I've made it a habit to collect some of my range brass over the years. I currently have approximately 1000 9mm brass, 1500 5.56 brass, 150 or or so 30.06 brass, and 50-60 .308 brass. Currently, all brass are stored in a ziplock bag. Some of it was retrieved from wet grass, etc. and very dirty. I'd like to get these cleaned up and ready for eventual reloading. If nothing else, the brass will look good while stored! It sounds like the hotness these days are wet tumbers, such as Franklin Arsenal's Wet Tumbler. Frankly, I don't want to drop $150+ on a tumber right now. Would this dry tumbler, using crushed walnut, be a good option? https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001MYGLJC/?coliid=I23RRGP2F10598&colid=3H1ZVDMT6BHM6&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it I'm also planning on purchasing Franklin Arsenal's hand deprimer tool since I don't have a reloading press to deprime. https://www.cabelas.com/product/FRANKFORD-ARSENOL-PLATINM-DEPRIME-TOOL/1969774.uts?productVariantId=4011399&WT.tsrc=PPC&WT.mc_id=GoogleProductAds&WT.z_mc_id1=04026742&rid=20&ds_rl=1252079&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI5eHI2pD83QIVx7jACh03IgUsEAQYASABEgLYDfD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds I appreciate any and all input!
  18. I think I'm actually at less than a thousand rounds a year right now. It's probably not cost effective for me to do reloading at that low of a rate, but the reloading itself is an interesting and entertaining hobby/skill and depending on how much worse my state gets, might become very necessary in the future if I want to exercise my god given rights.
  19. I'm somewhat in the same boat. I like options (hobbies) for rainy days, so to speak. I don't shoot 20k rounds a year as others do in matches and training, heck I don't even shoot 5k rounds a year at the current rate. But I COULD upload A LOT and that's what I like. Close to 60 different powders is all that I'll give away. Christmas is reloading time for me. Wait and see... I'll come up with some neat stuff...
  20. a couple years ago I was in the woodshop and found my dad's old press. He never actually reloaded anything with it, and he only had the dies for 7mm magnum (which I've never shot, and he only shot a couple times before deciding he didn't need that much range where he was hunting) I bought a G20.4 3 or 4 years ago, and decided that I should probably learn to reload to feed it. I went out and bought a sailboat keel chunk for some lead, bought everything I need to cast and powdercoat bullets, and load up half a dozen calibers. Bought a good supply of powder just as it was coming back on the market near the end of the Obama reign of terror, and then I've pretty much just sat on it since then. I've loaded up a couple thousand copper plated .40 and 9mm rounds, cast a few thousand of .40 and 30 cal bullets, and probably shot a grand total of maybe 30 of them. I dunno, I'm a little bit of a hoarder I think, so once I get everything set up and make a few, I realize that I don't really want to shoot it up because then I'd be burning the money I spent to buy all this stuff...
  21. 30.06-M1 Garand and Model 1917-Great American military rifles, from a time when America still won wars. .223-Bushmaster AR and Howa 1500-Bought my Bushy back in the 90's. It has a fixed carry handle and 20" barrel. My Howa was purchased used. .17 Remington Center fire-Remington 700. I have been fascinated with the cartridge since the 1970's. The idea of super speed superlight projectiles. I finally purchased the Remington when I found one in my lgs-it was used, had very few rounds fired. Its fun to blow up plastic milk jugs fill of water at 200 yards with hollow points. I am not a hunter, but a range shooter. I shoot because I love to do it, not for any other reason. Been at it more then 50 years.
  22. .223 30-06 .45-70
  23. .308 = I get free brass for this from local swat team. .223/5.56 = get free brass for this 300 blk = converting .223/5.56 brass that I got for free, and cast bullets to shoot subsonic. 22LR gets an honorable mention
  24. You know how that goes... ...does she have a sister?
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